The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System, Second Edition
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sys/conf/NOTES

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    1 # $FreeBSD$
    2 #
    3 # NOTES -- Lines that can be cut/pasted into kernel and hints configs.
    4 #
    5 # Lines that begin with 'device', 'options', 'machine', 'ident', 'maxusers',
    6 # 'makeoptions', 'hints', etc. go into the kernel configuration that you
    7 # run config(8) with.
    8 #
    9 # Lines that begin with 'hint.' are NOT for config(8), they go into your
   10 # hints file.  See /boot/device.hints and/or the 'hints' config(8) directive.
   11 #
   12 # Please use ``make LINT'' to create an old-style LINT file if you want to
   13 # do kernel test-builds.
   14 #
   15 # This file contains machine independent kernel configuration notes.  For
   16 # machine dependent notes, look in /sys/<arch>/conf/NOTES.
   17 #
   18 
   19 #
   20 # NOTES conventions and style guide:
   21 #
   22 # Large block comments should begin and end with a line containing only a
   23 # comment character.
   24 #
   25 # To describe a particular object, a block comment (if it exists) should
   26 # come first.  Next should come device, options, and hints lines in that
   27 # order.  All device and option lines must be described by a comment that
   28 # doesn't just expand the device or option name.  Use only a concise
   29 # comment on the same line if possible.  Very detailed descriptions of
   30 # devices and subsystems belong in man pages.
   31 #
   32 # A space followed by a tab separates 'options' from an option name.  Two
   33 # spaces followed by a tab separate 'device' from a device name.  Comments
   34 # after an option or device should use one space after the comment character.
   35 # To comment out a negative option that disables code and thus should not be
   36 # enabled for LINT builds, precede 'options' with "#!".
   37 #
   38 
   39 #
   40 # This is the ``identification'' of the kernel.  Usually this should
   41 # be the same as the name of your kernel.
   42 #
   43 ident           LINT
   44 
   45 #
   46 # The `maxusers' parameter controls the static sizing of a number of
   47 # internal system tables by a formula defined in subr_param.c.
   48 # Omitting this parameter or setting it to 0 will cause the system to
   49 # auto-size based on physical memory.
   50 #
   51 maxusers        10
   52 
   53 #
   54 # The `makeoptions' parameter allows variables to be passed to the
   55 # generated Makefile in the build area.
   56 #
   57 # CONF_CFLAGS gives some extra compiler flags that are added to ${CFLAGS}
   58 # after most other flags.  Here we use it to inhibit use of non-optimal
   59 # gcc built-in functions (e.g., memcmp).
   60 #
   61 # DEBUG happens to be magic.
   62 # The following is equivalent to 'config -g KERNELNAME' and creates
   63 # 'kernel.debug' compiled with -g debugging as well as a normal
   64 # 'kernel'.  Use 'make install.debug' to install the debug kernel
   65 # but that isn't normally necessary as the debug symbols are not loaded
   66 # by the kernel and are not useful there anyway.
   67 #
   68 # KERNEL can be overridden so that you can change the default name of your
   69 # kernel.
   70 #
   71 # MODULES_OVERRIDE can be used to limit modules built to a specific list.
   72 #
   73 makeoptions     CONF_CFLAGS=-fno-builtin  #Don't allow use of memcmp, etc.
   74 #makeoptions    DEBUG=-g                #Build kernel with gdb(1) debug symbols
   75 #makeoptions    KERNEL=foo              #Build kernel "foo" and install "/foo"
   76 # Only build ext2fs module plus those parts of the sound system I need.
   77 #makeoptions    MODULES_OVERRIDE="ext2fs sound/sound sound/driver/maestro3"
   78 makeoptions     DESTDIR=/tmp
   79 
   80 #
   81 # FreeBSD processes are subject to certain limits to their consumption
   82 # of system resources.  See getrlimit(2) for more details.  Each
   83 # resource limit has two values, a "soft" limit and a "hard" limit.
   84 # The soft limits can be modified during normal system operation, but
   85 # the hard limits are set at boot time.  Their default values are
   86 # in sys/<arch>/include/vmparam.h.  There are two ways to change them:
   87 # 
   88 # 1.  Set the values at kernel build time.  The options below are one
   89 #     way to allow that limit to grow to 1GB.  They can be increased
   90 #     further by changing the parameters:
   91 #       
   92 # 2.  In /boot/loader.conf, set the tunables kern.maxswzone,
   93 #     kern.maxbcache, kern.maxtsiz, kern.dfldsiz, kern.maxdsiz,
   94 #     kern.dflssiz, kern.maxssiz and kern.sgrowsiz.
   95 #
   96 # The options in /boot/loader.conf override anything in the kernel
   97 # configuration file.  See the function init_param1 in
   98 # sys/kern/subr_param.c for more details.
   99 #
  100 
  101 options         MAXDSIZ=(1024UL*1024*1024)
  102 options         MAXSSIZ=(128UL*1024*1024)
  103 options         DFLDSIZ=(1024UL*1024*1024)
  104 
  105 #
  106 # BLKDEV_IOSIZE sets the default block size used in user block
  107 # device I/O.  Note that this value will be overridden by the label
  108 # when specifying a block device from a label with a non-0
  109 # partition blocksize.  The default is PAGE_SIZE.
  110 #
  111 options         BLKDEV_IOSIZE=8192
  112 
  113 #
  114 # MAXPHYS and DFLTPHYS
  115 #
  116 # These are the max and default 'raw' I/O block device access sizes.
  117 # Reads and writes will be split into DFLTPHYS chunks. Some applications
  118 # have better performance with larger raw I/O access sizes. Typically
  119 # MAXPHYS should be twice the size of DFLTPHYS. Note that certain VM
  120 # parameters are derived from these values and making them too large
  121 # can make an an unbootable kernel.
  122 #
  123 # The defaults are 64K and 128K respectively.
  124 options         DFLTPHYS=(64*1024)
  125 options         MAXPHYS=(128*1024)
  126 
  127 
  128 # This allows you to actually store this configuration file into
  129 # the kernel binary itself, where it may be later read by saying:
  130 #    strings -n 3 /boot/kernel/kernel | sed -n 's/^___//p' > MYKERNEL
  131 #
  132 options         INCLUDE_CONFIG_FILE     # Include this file in kernel
  133 
  134 options         GEOM_AES                # Don't use, use GEOM_BDE
  135 options         GEOM_BDE                # Disk encryption.
  136 options         GEOM_BSD                # BSD disklabels
  137 options         GEOM_CACHE              # Disk cache.
  138 options         GEOM_CONCAT             # Disk concatenation.
  139 options         GEOM_ELI                # Disk encryption.
  140 options         GEOM_FOX                # Redundant path mitigation
  141 options         GEOM_GATE               # Userland services.
  142 options         GEOM_JOURNAL            # Journaling.
  143 options         GEOM_LABEL              # Providers labelization.
  144 options         GEOM_LINUX_LVM          # Linux LVM2 volumes
  145 options         GEOM_MBR                # DOS/MBR partitioning
  146 options         GEOM_MIRROR             # Disk mirroring.
  147 options         GEOM_MULTIPATH          # Disk multipath
  148 options         GEOM_NOP                # Test class.
  149 options         GEOM_PART_APM           # Apple partitioning
  150 options         GEOM_PART_BSD           # BSD disklabel
  151 options         GEOM_PART_GPT           # GPT partitioning
  152 options         GEOM_PART_MBR           # MBR partitioning
  153 options         GEOM_PART_VTOC8         # SMI VTOC8 disk label
  154 options         GEOM_PC98               # NEC PC9800 partitioning
  155 options         GEOM_RAID3              # RAID3 functionality.
  156 options         GEOM_SHSEC              # Shared secret.
  157 options         GEOM_STRIPE             # Disk striping.
  158 options         GEOM_SUNLABEL           # Sun/Solaris partitioning
  159 options         GEOM_UZIP               # Read-only compressed disks
  160 options         GEOM_VIRSTOR            # Virtual storage.
  161 options         GEOM_VOL                # Volume names from UFS superblock
  162 options         GEOM_ZERO               # Performance testing helper.
  163 
  164 #
  165 # The root device and filesystem type can be compiled in;
  166 # this provides a fallback option if the root device cannot
  167 # be correctly guessed by the bootstrap code, or an override if
  168 # the RB_DFLTROOT flag (-r) is specified when booting the kernel.
  169 #
  170 options         ROOTDEVNAME=\"ufs:da0s2e\"
  171 
  172 
  173 #####################################################################
  174 # Scheduler options:
  175 #
  176 # Specifying one of SCHED_4BSD or SCHED_ULE is mandatory.  These options
  177 # select which scheduler is compiled in.
  178 #
  179 # SCHED_4BSD is the historical, proven, BSD scheduler.  It has a global run
  180 # queue and no CPU affinity which makes it suboptimal for SMP.  It has very
  181 # good interactivity and priority selection.
  182 #
  183 # SCHED_ULE provides significant performance advantages over 4BSD on many
  184 # workloads on SMP machines.  It supports cpu-affinity, per-cpu runqueues
  185 # and scheduler locks.  It also has a stronger notion of interactivity 
  186 # which leads to better responsiveness even on uniprocessor machines.  This
  187 # will eventually become the default scheduler.
  188 #
  189 options         SCHED_4BSD
  190 #options        SCHED_ULE
  191 
  192 #####################################################################
  193 # SMP OPTIONS:
  194 #
  195 # SMP enables building of a Symmetric MultiProcessor Kernel.
  196 
  197 # Mandatory:
  198 options         SMP                     # Symmetric MultiProcessor Kernel
  199 
  200 # ADAPTIVE_MUTEXES changes the behavior of blocking mutexes to spin
  201 # if the thread that currently owns the mutex is executing on another
  202 # CPU.  This behaviour is enabled by default, so this option can be used
  203 # to disable it.
  204 options         NO_ADAPTIVE_MUTEXES
  205 
  206 # ADAPTIVE_RWLOCKS changes the behavior of reader/writer locks to spin
  207 # if the thread that currently owns the rwlock is executing on another
  208 # CPU.  This behaviour is enabled by default, so this option can be used
  209 # to disable it.
  210 options         NO_ADAPTIVE_RWLOCKS
  211 
  212 # ADAPTIVE_GIANT causes the Giant lock to also be made adaptive when
  213 # running without NO_ADAPTIVE_MUTEXES.  Normally, because Giant is assumed
  214 # to be held for extended periods, contention on Giant will cause a thread
  215 # to sleep rather than spinning.
  216 options         ADAPTIVE_GIANT
  217 
  218 # ADAPTIVE_SX changes the behavior of sx locks to spin if the thread
  219 # that currently owns the lock is executing on another CPU.  Note that
  220 # in addition to enabling this option, individual sx locks must be
  221 # initialized with the SX_ADAPTIVESPIN flag.
  222 options         ADAPTIVE_SX
  223 
  224 # MUTEX_NOINLINE forces mutex operations to call functions to perform each
  225 # operation rather than inlining the simple cases.  This can be used to
  226 # shrink the size of the kernel text segment.  Note that this behavior is
  227 # already implied by the INVARIANT_SUPPORT, INVARIANTS, KTR, LOCK_PROFILING,
  228 # and WITNESS options.
  229 options         MUTEX_NOINLINE
  230 
  231 # RWLOCK_NOINLINE forces rwlock operations to call functions to perform each
  232 # operation rather than inlining the simple cases.  This can be used to
  233 # shrink the size of the kernel text segment.  Note that this behavior is
  234 # already implied by the INVARIANT_SUPPORT, INVARIANTS, KTR, LOCK_PROFILING,
  235 # and WITNESS options.
  236 options         RWLOCK_NOINLINE
  237 
  238 # SX_NOINLINE forces sx lock operations to call functions to perform each
  239 # operation rather than inlining the simple cases.  This can be used to
  240 # shrink the size of the kernel text segment.  Note that this behavior is
  241 # already implied by the INVARIANT_SUPPORT, INVARIANTS, KTR, LOCK_PROFILING,
  242 # and WITNESS options.
  243 options         SX_NOINLINE
  244 
  245 # SMP Debugging Options:
  246 #
  247 # PREEMPTION allows the threads that are in the kernel to be preempted
  248 #         by higher priority threads.  It helps with interactivity and
  249 #         allows interrupt threads to run sooner rather than waiting.
  250 #         WARNING! Only tested on amd64 and i386.
  251 # FULL_PREEMPTION instructs the kernel to preempt non-realtime kernel
  252 #         threads.  Its sole use is to expose race conditions and other
  253 #         bugs during development.  Enabling this option will reduce
  254 #         performance and increase the frequency of kernel panics by
  255 #         design.  If you aren't sure that you need it then you don't.
  256 #         Relies on the PREEMPTION option.  DON'T TURN THIS ON.
  257 # MUTEX_DEBUG enables various extra assertions in the mutex code.
  258 # SLEEPQUEUE_PROFILING enables rudimentary profiling of the hash table
  259 #         used to hold active sleep queues.
  260 # TURNSTILE_PROFILING enables rudimentary profiling of the hash table
  261 #         used to hold active lock queues.
  262 # WITNESS enables the witness code which detects deadlocks and cycles
  263 #         during locking operations.
  264 # WITNESS_KDB causes the witness code to drop into the kernel debugger if
  265 #         a lock hierarchy violation occurs or if locks are held when going to
  266 #         sleep.
  267 # WITNESS_SKIPSPIN disables the witness checks on spin mutexes.
  268 options         PREEMPTION
  269 options         FULL_PREEMPTION
  270 options         MUTEX_DEBUG
  271 options         WITNESS
  272 options         WITNESS_KDB
  273 options         WITNESS_SKIPSPIN
  274 
  275 # LOCK_PROFILING - Profiling locks.  See LOCK_PROFILING(9) for details.
  276 options         LOCK_PROFILING
  277 # Set the number of buffers and the hash size.  The hash size MUST be larger
  278 # than the number of buffers.  Hash size should be prime.
  279 options         MPROF_BUFFERS="1536"
  280 options         MPROF_HASH_SIZE="1543"
  281 
  282 # Profiling for internal hash tables.
  283 options         SLEEPQUEUE_PROFILING
  284 options         TURNSTILE_PROFILING
  285 
  286 
  287 #####################################################################
  288 # COMPATIBILITY OPTIONS
  289 
  290 #
  291 # Implement system calls compatible with 4.3BSD and older versions of
  292 # FreeBSD.  You probably do NOT want to remove this as much current code
  293 # still relies on the 4.3 emulation.  Note that some architectures that
  294 # are supported by FreeBSD do not include support for certain important
  295 # aspects of this compatibility option, namely those related to the
  296 # signal delivery mechanism.
  297 #
  298 options         COMPAT_43
  299 
  300 # Old tty interface.
  301 options         COMPAT_43TTY
  302 
  303 # Enable FreeBSD4 compatibility syscalls
  304 options         COMPAT_FREEBSD4
  305 
  306 # Enable FreeBSD5 compatibility syscalls
  307 options         COMPAT_FREEBSD5
  308 
  309 # Enable FreeBSD6 compatibility syscalls
  310 options         COMPAT_FREEBSD6
  311 
  312 #
  313 # These three options provide support for System V Interface
  314 # Definition-style interprocess communication, in the form of shared
  315 # memory, semaphores, and message queues, respectively.
  316 #
  317 options         SYSVSHM
  318 options         SYSVSEM
  319 options         SYSVMSG
  320 
  321 
  322 #####################################################################
  323 # DEBUGGING OPTIONS
  324 
  325 #
  326 # Compile with kernel debugger related code.
  327 #
  328 options         KDB
  329 
  330 #
  331 # Print a stack trace of the current thread on the console for a panic.
  332 #
  333 options         KDB_TRACE
  334 
  335 #
  336 # Don't enter the debugger for a panic. Intended for unattended operation
  337 # where you may want to enter the debugger from the console, but still want
  338 # the machine to recover from a panic.
  339 #
  340 options         KDB_UNATTENDED
  341 
  342 #
  343 # Enable the ddb debugger backend.
  344 #
  345 options         DDB
  346 
  347 #
  348 # Print the numerical value of symbols in addition to the symbolic
  349 # representation.
  350 #
  351 options         DDB_NUMSYM
  352 
  353 #
  354 # Enable the remote gdb debugger backend.
  355 #
  356 options         GDB
  357 
  358 #
  359 # Enable the kernel DTrace hooks which are required to load the DTrace
  360 # kernel modules.
  361 #
  362 options         KDTRACE_HOOKS
  363 
  364 #
  365 # SYSCTL_DEBUG enables a 'sysctl' debug tree that can be used to dump the
  366 # contents of the registered sysctl nodes on the console.  It is disabled by
  367 # default because it generates excessively verbose console output that can
  368 # interfere with serial console operation.
  369 #
  370 options         SYSCTL_DEBUG
  371 
  372 #
  373 # DEBUG_MEMGUARD builds and enables memguard(9), a replacement allocator
  374 # for the kernel used to detect modify-after-free scenarios.  See the
  375 # memguard(9) man page for more information on usage.
  376 #
  377 options         DEBUG_MEMGUARD
  378 
  379 #
  380 # DEBUG_REDZONE enables buffer underflows and buffer overflows detection for
  381 # malloc(9).
  382 #
  383 options         DEBUG_REDZONE
  384 
  385 #
  386 # KTRACE enables the system-call tracing facility ktrace(2).  To be more
  387 # SMP-friendly, KTRACE uses a worker thread to process most trace events
  388 # asynchronously to the thread generating the event.  This requires a
  389 # pre-allocated store of objects representing trace events.  The
  390 # KTRACE_REQUEST_POOL option specifies the initial size of this store.
  391 # The size of the pool can be adjusted both at boottime and runtime via
  392 # the kern.ktrace_request_pool tunable and sysctl.
  393 #
  394 options         KTRACE                  #kernel tracing
  395 options         KTRACE_REQUEST_POOL=101
  396 
  397 #
  398 # KTR is a kernel tracing mechanism imported from BSD/OS.  Currently
  399 # it has no userland interface aside from a few sysctl's.  It is
  400 # enabled with the KTR option.  KTR_ENTRIES defines the number of
  401 # entries in the circular trace buffer; it must be a power of two.
  402 # KTR_COMPILE defines the mask of events to compile into the kernel as
  403 # defined by the KTR_* constants in <sys/ktr.h>.  KTR_MASK defines the
  404 # initial value of the ktr_mask variable which determines at runtime
  405 # what events to trace.  KTR_CPUMASK determines which CPU's log
  406 # events, with bit X corresponding to CPU X.  KTR_VERBOSE enables
  407 # dumping of KTR events to the console by default.  This functionality
  408 # can be toggled via the debug.ktr_verbose sysctl and defaults to off
  409 # if KTR_VERBOSE is not defined.
  410 #
  411 options         KTR
  412 options         KTR_ENTRIES=1024
  413 options         KTR_COMPILE=(KTR_INTR|KTR_PROC)
  414 options         KTR_MASK=KTR_INTR
  415 options         KTR_CPUMASK=0x3
  416 options         KTR_VERBOSE
  417 
  418 #
  419 # ALQ(9) is a facility for the asynchronous queuing of records from the kernel
  420 # to a vnode, and is employed by services such as KTR(4) to produce trace
  421 # files based on a kernel event stream.  Records are written asynchronously
  422 # in a worker thread.
  423 #
  424 options         ALQ
  425 options         KTR_ALQ
  426 
  427 #
  428 # The INVARIANTS option is used in a number of source files to enable
  429 # extra sanity checking of internal structures.  This support is not
  430 # enabled by default because of the extra time it would take to check
  431 # for these conditions, which can only occur as a result of
  432 # programming errors.
  433 #
  434 options         INVARIANTS
  435 
  436 #
  437 # The INVARIANT_SUPPORT option makes us compile in support for
  438 # verifying some of the internal structures.  It is a prerequisite for
  439 # 'INVARIANTS', as enabling 'INVARIANTS' will make these functions be
  440 # called.  The intent is that you can set 'INVARIANTS' for single
  441 # source files (by changing the source file or specifying it on the
  442 # command line) if you have 'INVARIANT_SUPPORT' enabled.  Also, if you
  443 # wish to build a kernel module with 'INVARIANTS', then adding
  444 # 'INVARIANT_SUPPORT' to your kernel will provide all the necessary
  445 # infrastructure without the added overhead.
  446 #
  447 options         INVARIANT_SUPPORT
  448 
  449 #
  450 # The DIAGNOSTIC option is used to enable extra debugging information
  451 # from some parts of the kernel.  As this makes everything more noisy,
  452 # it is disabled by default.
  453 #
  454 options         DIAGNOSTIC
  455 
  456 #
  457 # REGRESSION causes optional kernel interfaces necessary only for regression
  458 # testing to be enabled.  These interfaces may constitute security risks
  459 # when enabled, as they permit processes to easily modify aspects of the
  460 # run-time environment to reproduce unlikely or unusual (possibly normally
  461 # impossible) scenarios.
  462 #
  463 options         REGRESSION
  464 
  465 #
  466 # RESTARTABLE_PANICS allows one to continue from a panic as if it were
  467 # a call to the debugger to continue from a panic as instead.  It is only
  468 # useful if a kernel debugger is present.  To restart from a panic, reset
  469 # the panicstr variable to NULL and continue execution.  This option is
  470 # for development use only and should NOT be used in production systems
  471 # to "workaround" a panic.
  472 #
  473 #options        RESTARTABLE_PANICS
  474 
  475 #
  476 # This option let some drivers co-exist that can't co-exist in a running
  477 # system.  This is used to be able to compile all kernel code in one go for
  478 # quality assurance purposes (like this file, which the option takes it name
  479 # from.)
  480 #
  481 options         COMPILING_LINT
  482 
  483 #
  484 # STACK enables the stack(9) facility, allowing the capture of kernel stack
  485 # for the purpose of procinfo(1), etc.  stack(9) will also be compiled in
  486 # automatically if DDB(4) is compiled into the kernel.
  487 #
  488 options         STACK
  489 
  490 
  491 #####################################################################
  492 # PERFORMANCE MONITORING OPTIONS
  493 
  494 #
  495 # The hwpmc driver that allows the use of in-CPU performance monitoring
  496 # counters for performance monitoring.  The base kernel needs to configured
  497 # with the 'options' line, while the hwpmc device can be either compiled
  498 # in or loaded as a loadable kernel module.
  499 #
  500 # Additional configuration options may be required on specific architectures,
  501 # please see hwpmc(4).
  502 
  503 device          hwpmc                   # Driver (also a loadable module)
  504 options         HWPMC_HOOKS             # Other necessary kernel hooks
  505 
  506 
  507 #####################################################################
  508 # NETWORKING OPTIONS
  509 
  510 #
  511 # Protocol families
  512 #
  513 options         INET                    #Internet communications protocols
  514 options         INET6                   #IPv6 communications protocols
  515 
  516 options         ROUTETABLES=2           # max 16. 1 is back compatible.
  517 
  518 # In order to enable IPSEC you MUST also add device crypto to 
  519 # your kernel configuration
  520 options         IPSEC                   #IP security (requires device crypto)
  521 #options        IPSEC_DEBUG             #debug for IP security
  522 #
  523 # Set IPSEC_FILTERTUNNEL to force packets coming through a tunnel
  524 # to be processed by any configured packet filtering twice.
  525 # The default is that packets coming out of a tunnel are _not_ processed;
  526 # they are assumed trusted.
  527 #
  528 # IPSEC history is preserved for such packets, and can be filtered
  529 # using ipfw(8)'s 'ipsec' keyword, when this option is enabled.
  530 #
  531 #options        IPSEC_FILTERTUNNEL      #filter ipsec packets from a tunnel
  532 
  533 options         IPX                     #IPX/SPX communications protocols
  534 
  535 options         NCP                     #NetWare Core protocol
  536 
  537 options         NETATALK                #Appletalk communications protocols
  538 options         NETATALKDEBUG           #Appletalk debugging
  539 
  540 #
  541 # SMB/CIFS requester
  542 # NETSMB enables support for SMB protocol, it requires LIBMCHAIN and LIBICONV
  543 # options.
  544 options         NETSMB                  #SMB/CIFS requester
  545 
  546 # mchain library. It can be either loaded as KLD or compiled into kernel
  547 options         LIBMCHAIN
  548 
  549 # libalias library, performing NAT
  550 options         LIBALIAS
  551 
  552 #
  553 # SCTP is a NEW transport protocol defined by
  554 # RFC2960 updated by RFC3309 and RFC3758.. and
  555 # soon to have a new base RFC and many many more
  556 # extensions. This release supports all the extensions
  557 # including many drafts (most about to become RFC's).
  558 # It is the premeier SCTP implementation in the NET
  559 # and is quite well tested.
  560 #
  561 # Note YOU MUST have both INET and INET6 defined.
  562 # you don't have to enable V6, but SCTP is 
  563 # dual stacked and so far we have not teased apart
  564 # the V6 and V4.. since an association can span
  565 # both a V6 and V4 address at the SAME time :-)
  566 #
  567 options         SCTP
  568 # There are bunches of options:
  569 # this one turns on all sorts of
  570 # nastly printing that you can
  571 # do. Its all controled by a
  572 # bit mask (settable by socket opt and
  573 # by sysctl). Including will not cause
  574 # logging until you set the bits.. but it
  575 # can be quite verbose.. so without this
  576 # option we don't do any of the tests for
  577 # bits and prints.. which makes the code run
  578 # faster.. if you are not debugging don't use.
  579 options SCTP_DEBUG
  580 #
  581 # This option turns off the CRC32c checksum. Basically
  582 # You will not be able to talk to anyone else that
  583 # has not done this. Its more for expermentation to
  584 # see how much CPU the CRC32c really takes. Most new
  585 # cards for TCP support checksum offload.. so this 
  586 # option gives you a "view" into what SCTP would be
  587 # like with such an offload (which only exists in
  588 # high in iSCSI boards so far). With the new
  589 # splitting 8's algorithm its not as bad as it used
  590 # to be.. but it does speed things up try only
  591 # for in a captured lab environment :-)
  592 options SCTP_WITH_NO_CSUM
  593 #
  594 
  595 #
  596 # All that options after that turn on specific types of
  597 # logging. You can monitor CWND growth, flight size
  598 # and all sorts of things. Go look at the code and
  599 # see. I have used this to produce interesting 
  600 # charts and graphs as well :->
  601 # 
  602 # I have not yet commited the tools to get and print
  603 # the logs, I will do that eventually .. before then
  604 # if you want them send me an email rrs@freebsd.org
  605 # You basically must have KTR enabled for these
  606 # and you then set the sysctl to turn on/off various
  607 # logging bits. Use ktrdump to pull the log and run
  608 # it through a dispaly program.. and graphs and other
  609 # things too.
  610 #
  611 options         SCTP_LOCK_LOGGING
  612 options         SCTP_MBUF_LOGGING
  613 options         SCTP_MBCNT_LOGGING
  614 options         SCTP_PACKET_LOGGING
  615 options         SCTP_LTRACE_CHUNKS
  616 options         SCTP_LTRACE_ERRORS
  617 
  618 
  619 # altq(9). Enable the base part of the hooks with the ALTQ option.
  620 # Individual disciplines must be built into the base system and can not be
  621 # loaded as modules at this point. ALTQ requires a stable TSC so if yours is
  622 # broken or changes with CPU throttling then you must also have the ALTQ_NOPCC
  623 # option.
  624 options         ALTQ
  625 options         ALTQ_CBQ        # Class Based Queueing
  626 options         ALTQ_RED        # Random Early Detection
  627 options         ALTQ_RIO        # RED In/Out
  628 options         ALTQ_HFSC       # Hierarchical Packet Scheduler
  629 options         ALTQ_CDNR       # Traffic conditioner
  630 options         ALTQ_PRIQ       # Priority Queueing
  631 options         ALTQ_NOPCC      # Required if the TSC is unusable
  632 options         ALTQ_DEBUG
  633 
  634 # netgraph(4). Enable the base netgraph code with the NETGRAPH option.
  635 # Individual node types can be enabled with the corresponding option
  636 # listed below; however, this is not strictly necessary as netgraph
  637 # will automatically load the corresponding KLD module if the node type
  638 # is not already compiled into the kernel. Each type below has a
  639 # corresponding man page, e.g., ng_async(8).
  640 options         NETGRAPH                # netgraph(4) system
  641 options         NETGRAPH_DEBUG          # enable extra debugging, this
  642                                         # affects netgraph(4) and nodes
  643 # Node types
  644 options         NETGRAPH_ASYNC
  645 options         NETGRAPH_ATMLLC
  646 options         NETGRAPH_ATM_ATMPIF
  647 options         NETGRAPH_BLUETOOTH              # ng_bluetooth(4)
  648 options         NETGRAPH_BLUETOOTH_BT3C         # ng_bt3c(4)
  649 options         NETGRAPH_BLUETOOTH_H4           # ng_h4(4)
  650 options         NETGRAPH_BLUETOOTH_HCI          # ng_hci(4)
  651 options         NETGRAPH_BLUETOOTH_L2CAP        # ng_l2cap(4)
  652 options         NETGRAPH_BLUETOOTH_SOCKET       # ng_btsocket(4)
  653 options         NETGRAPH_BLUETOOTH_UBT          # ng_ubt(4)
  654 options         NETGRAPH_BLUETOOTH_UBTBCMFW     # ubtbcmfw(4)
  655 options         NETGRAPH_BPF
  656 options         NETGRAPH_BRIDGE
  657 options         NETGRAPH_CAR
  658 options         NETGRAPH_CISCO
  659 options         NETGRAPH_DEFLATE
  660 options         NETGRAPH_DEVICE
  661 options         NETGRAPH_ECHO
  662 options         NETGRAPH_EIFACE
  663 options         NETGRAPH_ETHER
  664 options         NETGRAPH_FEC
  665 options         NETGRAPH_FRAME_RELAY
  666 options         NETGRAPH_GIF
  667 options         NETGRAPH_GIF_DEMUX
  668 options         NETGRAPH_HOLE
  669 options         NETGRAPH_IFACE
  670 options         NETGRAPH_IP_INPUT
  671 options         NETGRAPH_IPFW
  672 options         NETGRAPH_KSOCKET
  673 options         NETGRAPH_L2TP
  674 options         NETGRAPH_LMI
  675 # MPPC compression requires proprietary files (not included)
  676 #options        NETGRAPH_MPPC_COMPRESSION
  677 options         NETGRAPH_MPPC_ENCRYPTION
  678 options         NETGRAPH_NETFLOW
  679 options         NETGRAPH_NAT
  680 options         NETGRAPH_ONE2MANY
  681 options         NETGRAPH_PPP
  682 options         NETGRAPH_PPPOE
  683 options         NETGRAPH_PPTPGRE
  684 options         NETGRAPH_PRED1
  685 options         NETGRAPH_RFC1490
  686 options         NETGRAPH_SOCKET
  687 options         NETGRAPH_SPLIT
  688 options         NETGRAPH_SPPP
  689 options         NETGRAPH_TAG
  690 options         NETGRAPH_TCPMSS
  691 options         NETGRAPH_TEE
  692 options         NETGRAPH_TTY
  693 options         NETGRAPH_UI
  694 options         NETGRAPH_VJC
  695 
  696 # NgATM - Netgraph ATM
  697 options         NGATM_ATM
  698 options         NGATM_ATMBASE
  699 options         NGATM_SSCOP
  700 options         NGATM_SSCFU
  701 options         NGATM_UNI
  702 options         NGATM_CCATM
  703 
  704 device          mn      # Munich32x/Falc54 Nx64kbit/sec cards.
  705 
  706 #
  707 # Network interfaces:
  708 #  The `loop' device is MANDATORY when networking is enabled.
  709 #  The `ether' device provides generic code to handle
  710 #  Ethernets; it is MANDATORY when an Ethernet device driver is
  711 #  configured or token-ring is enabled.
  712 #  The `vlan' device implements the VLAN tagging of Ethernet frames
  713 #  according to IEEE 802.1Q.  It requires `device miibus'.
  714 #  The `wlan' device provides generic code to support 802.11
  715 #  drivers, including host AP mode; it is MANDATORY for the wi,
  716 #  ath, and awi drivers and will eventually be required by all 802.11 drivers.
  717 #  The `wlan_wep', `wlan_tkip', and `wlan_ccmp' devices provide
  718 #  support for WEP, TKIP, and AES-CCMP crypto protocols optionally
  719 #  used with 802.11 devices that depend on the `wlan' module.
  720 #  The `wlan_xauth' device provides support for external (i.e. user-mode)
  721 #  authenticators for use with 802.11 drivers that use the `wlan'
  722 #  module and support 802.1x and/or WPA security protocols.
  723 #  The `wlan_acl' device provides a MAC-based access control mechanism
  724 #  for use with 802.11 drivers operating in ap mode and using the
  725 #  `wlan' module.
  726 #  The `fddi' device provides generic code to support FDDI.
  727 #  The `arcnet' device provides generic code to support Arcnet.
  728 #  The `sppp' device serves a similar role for certain types
  729 #  of synchronous PPP links (like `cx', `ar').
  730 #  The `sl' device implements the Serial Line IP (SLIP) service.
  731 #  The `ppp' device implements the Point-to-Point Protocol.
  732 #  The `bpf' device enables the Berkeley Packet Filter.  Be
  733 #  aware of the legal and administrative consequences of enabling this
  734 #  option.  The number of devices determines the maximum number of
  735 #  simultaneous BPF clients programs runnable.  DHCP requires bpf.
  736 #  The `disc' device implements a minimal network interface,
  737 #  which throws away all packets sent and never receives any.  It is
  738 #  included for testing and benchmarking purposes.
  739 #  The `edsc' device implements a minimal Ethernet interface,
  740 #  which discards all packets sent and receives none.
  741 #  The `tap' device is a pty-like virtual Ethernet interface
  742 #  The `tun' device implements (user-)ppp and nos-tun
  743 #  The `gif' device implements IPv6 over IP4 tunneling,
  744 #  IPv4 over IPv6 tunneling, IPv4 over IPv4 tunneling and
  745 #  IPv6 over IPv6 tunneling.
  746 #  The `gre' device implements two types of IP4 over IP4 tunneling:
  747 #  GRE and MOBILE, as specified in the RFC1701 and RFC2004.
  748 #  The XBONEHACK option allows the same pair of addresses to be configured on
  749 #  multiple gif interfaces.
  750 #  The `faith' device captures packets sent to it and diverts them
  751 #  to the IPv4/IPv6 translation daemon.
  752 #  The `stf' device implements 6to4 encapsulation.
  753 #  The `ef' device provides support for multiple ethernet frame types
  754 #  specified via ETHER_* options. See ef(4) for details.
  755 #
  756 # The pf packet filter consists of three devices:
  757 #  The `pf' device provides /dev/pf and the firewall code itself.
  758 #  The `pflog' device provides the pflog0 interface which logs packets.
  759 #  The `pfsync' device provides the pfsync0 interface used for
  760 #   synchronization of firewall state tables (over the net).
  761 #
  762 # The PPP_BSDCOMP option enables support for compress(1) style entire
  763 # packet compression, the PPP_DEFLATE is for zlib/gzip style compression.
  764 # PPP_FILTER enables code for filtering the ppp data stream and selecting
  765 # events for resetting the demand dial activity timer - requires bpf.
  766 # See pppd(8) for more details.
  767 #
  768 device          ether                   #Generic Ethernet
  769 device          vlan                    #VLAN support (needs miibus)
  770 device          wlan                    #802.11 support
  771 device          wlan_wep                #802.11 WEP support
  772 device          wlan_ccmp               #802.11 CCMP support
  773 device          wlan_tkip               #802.11 TKIP support
  774 device          wlan_xauth              #802.11 external authenticator support
  775 device          wlan_acl                #802.11 MAC ACL support
  776 device          wlan_amrr               #AMRR transmit rate control algorithm
  777 device          wlan_scan_ap            #802.11 AP mode scanning
  778 device          wlan_scan_sta           #802.11 STA mode scanning
  779 device          token                   #Generic TokenRing
  780 device          fddi                    #Generic FDDI
  781 device          arcnet                  #Generic Arcnet
  782 device          sppp                    #Generic Synchronous PPP
  783 device          loop                    #Network loopback device
  784 device          bpf                     #Berkeley packet filter
  785 device          disc                    #Discard device based on loopback
  786 device          edsc                    #Ethernet discard device
  787 device          tap                     #Virtual Ethernet driver
  788 device          tun                     #Tunnel driver (ppp(8), nos-tun(8))
  789 device          sl                      #Serial Line IP
  790 device          gre                     #IP over IP tunneling
  791 device          if_bridge               #Bridge interface
  792 device          pf                      #PF OpenBSD packet-filter firewall
  793 device          pflog                   #logging support interface for PF
  794 device          pfsync                  #synchronization interface for PF
  795 device          carp                    #Common Address Redundancy Protocol
  796 device          enc                     #IPsec interface
  797 device          ppp                     #Point-to-point protocol
  798 options         PPP_BSDCOMP             #PPP BSD-compress support
  799 options         PPP_DEFLATE             #PPP zlib/deflate/gzip support
  800 options         PPP_FILTER              #enable bpf filtering (needs bpf)
  801 device          lagg                    #Link aggregation interface
  802 
  803 device          ef                      # Multiple ethernet frames support
  804 options         ETHER_II                # enable Ethernet_II frame
  805 options         ETHER_8023              # enable Ethernet_802.3 (Novell) frame
  806 options         ETHER_8022              # enable Ethernet_802.2 frame
  807 options         ETHER_SNAP              # enable Ethernet_802.2/SNAP frame
  808 
  809 # for IPv6
  810 device          gif                     #IPv6 and IPv4 tunneling
  811 options         XBONEHACK
  812 device          faith                   #for IPv6 and IPv4 translation
  813 device          stf                     #6to4 IPv6 over IPv4 encapsulation
  814 
  815 #
  816 # Internet family options:
  817 #
  818 # MROUTING enables the kernel multicast packet forwarder, which works
  819 # with mrouted and XORP.
  820 #
  821 # IPFIREWALL enables support for IP firewall construction, in
  822 # conjunction with the `ipfw' program.  IPFIREWALL_VERBOSE sends
  823 # logged packets to the system logger.  IPFIREWALL_VERBOSE_LIMIT
  824 # limits the number of times a matching entry can be logged.
  825 #
  826 # WARNING:  IPFIREWALL defaults to a policy of "deny ip from any to any"
  827 # and if you do not add other rules during startup to allow access,
  828 # YOU WILL LOCK YOURSELF OUT.  It is suggested that you set firewall_type=open
  829 # in /etc/rc.conf when first enabling this feature, then refining the
  830 # firewall rules in /etc/rc.firewall after you've tested that the new kernel
  831 # feature works properly.
  832 #
  833 # IPFIREWALL_DEFAULT_TO_ACCEPT causes the default rule (at boot) to
  834 # allow everything.  Use with care, if a cracker can crash your
  835 # firewall machine, they can get to your protected machines.  However,
  836 # if you are using it as an as-needed filter for specific problems as
  837 # they arise, then this may be for you.  Changing the default to 'allow'
  838 # means that you won't get stuck if the kernel and /sbin/ipfw binary get
  839 # out of sync.
  840 #
  841 # IPDIVERT enables the divert IP sockets, used by ``ipfw divert''.  It
  842 # depends on IPFIREWALL if compiled into the kernel.
  843 #
  844 # IPFIREWALL_FORWARD enables changing of the packet destination either
  845 # to do some sort of policy routing or transparent proxying.  Used by
  846 # ``ipfw forward''. All  redirections apply to locally generated
  847 # packets too.  Because of this great care is required when
  848 # crafting the ruleset.
  849 #
  850 # IPFIREWALL_NAT adds support for in kernel nat in ipfw, and it requires
  851 # LIBALIAS.
  852 #
  853 # IPSTEALTH enables code to support stealth forwarding (i.e., forwarding
  854 # packets without touching the TTL).  This can be useful to hide firewalls
  855 # from traceroute and similar tools.
  856 #
  857 # TCPDEBUG enables code which keeps traces of the TCP state machine
  858 # for sockets with the SO_DEBUG option set, which can then be examined
  859 # using the trpt(8) utility.
  860 #
  861 options         MROUTING                # Multicast routing
  862 options         IPFIREWALL              #firewall
  863 options         IPFIREWALL_VERBOSE      #enable logging to syslogd(8)
  864 options         IPFIREWALL_VERBOSE_LIMIT=100    #limit verbosity
  865 options         IPFIREWALL_DEFAULT_TO_ACCEPT    #allow everything by default
  866 options         IPFIREWALL_FORWARD      #packet destination changes
  867 options         IPFIREWALL_NAT          #ipfw kernel nat support
  868 options         IPDIVERT                #divert sockets
  869 options         IPFILTER                #ipfilter support
  870 options         IPFILTER_LOG            #ipfilter logging
  871 options         IPFILTER_LOOKUP         #ipfilter pools
  872 options         IPFILTER_DEFAULT_BLOCK  #block all packets by default
  873 options         IPSTEALTH               #support for stealth forwarding
  874 options         TCPDEBUG
  875 
  876 # The MBUF_STRESS_TEST option enables options which create
  877 # various random failures / extreme cases related to mbuf
  878 # functions.  See mbuf(9) for a list of available test cases.
  879 options         MBUF_STRESS_TEST
  880 
  881 # Statically Link in accept filters
  882 options         ACCEPT_FILTER_DATA
  883 options         ACCEPT_FILTER_HTTP
  884 
  885 # TCP_SIGNATURE adds support for RFC 2385 (TCP-MD5) digests. These are
  886 # carried in TCP option 19. This option is commonly used to protect
  887 # TCP sessions (e.g. BGP) where IPSEC is not available nor desirable.
  888 # This is enabled on a per-socket basis using the TCP_MD5SIG socket option.
  889 # This requires the use of 'device crypto', 'options IPSEC'
  890 # or 'device cryptodev'.
  891 #options        TCP_SIGNATURE           #include support for RFC 2385
  892 
  893 # DUMMYNET enables the "dummynet" bandwidth limiter.  You need IPFIREWALL
  894 # as well.  See dummynet(4) and ipfw(8) for more info.  When you run
  895 # DUMMYNET it is advisable to also have at least "options HZ=1000" to achieve
  896 # a smooth scheduling of the traffic.
  897 options         DUMMYNET
  898 
  899 # Zero copy sockets support.  This enables "zero copy" for sending and
  900 # receiving data via a socket.  The send side works for any type of NIC,
  901 # the receive side only works for NICs that support MTUs greater than the
  902 # page size of your architecture and that support header splitting.  See
  903 # zero_copy(9) for more details.
  904 options         ZERO_COPY_SOCKETS
  905 
  906 
  907 #####################################################################
  908 # FILESYSTEM OPTIONS
  909 
  910 #
  911 # Only the root, /usr, and /tmp filesystems need be statically
  912 # compiled; everything else will be automatically loaded at mount
  913 # time.  (Exception: the UFS family--- FFS --- cannot
  914 # currently be demand-loaded.)  Some people still prefer to statically
  915 # compile other filesystems as well.
  916 #
  917 # NB: The PORTAL filesystem is known to be buggy, and WILL panic your
  918 # system if you attempt to do anything with it.  It is included here
  919 # as an incentive for some enterprising soul to sit down and fix it.
  920 # The UNION filesystem was known to be buggy in the past.  It is now
  921 # being actively maintained, although there are still some issues being
  922 # resolved.
  923 #
  924 
  925 # One of these is mandatory:
  926 options         FFS                     #Fast filesystem
  927 options         NFSCLIENT               #Network File System client
  928 
  929 # The rest are optional:
  930 options         CD9660                  #ISO 9660 filesystem
  931 options         FDESCFS                 #File descriptor filesystem
  932 options         HPFS                    #OS/2 File system
  933 options         MSDOSFS                 #MS DOS File System (FAT, FAT32)
  934 options         NFSSERVER               #Network File System server
  935 options         NFSLOCKD                #Network Lock Manager
  936 options         NTFS                    #NT File System
  937 options         NULLFS                  #NULL filesystem
  938 # Broken (depends on NCP):
  939 #options        NWFS                    #NetWare filesystem
  940 options         PORTALFS                #Portal filesystem
  941 options         PROCFS                  #Process filesystem (requires PSEUDOFS)
  942 options         PSEUDOFS                #Pseudo-filesystem framework
  943 options         PSEUDOFS_TRACE          #Debugging support for PSEUDOFS
  944 options         SMBFS                   #SMB/CIFS filesystem
  945 options         UDF                     #Universal Disk Format
  946 options         UNIONFS                 #Union filesystem
  947 # The xFS_ROOT options REQUIRE the associated ``options xFS''
  948 options         NFS_ROOT                #NFS usable as root device
  949 
  950 # Soft updates is a technique for improving filesystem speed and
  951 # making abrupt shutdown less risky.
  952 #
  953 options         SOFTUPDATES
  954 
  955 # Extended attributes allow additional data to be associated with files,
  956 # and is used for ACLs, Capabilities, and MAC labels.
  957 # See src/sys/ufs/ufs/README.extattr for more information.
  958 options         UFS_EXTATTR
  959 options         UFS_EXTATTR_AUTOSTART
  960 
  961 # Access Control List support for UFS filesystems.  The current ACL
  962 # implementation requires extended attribute support, UFS_EXTATTR,
  963 # for the underlying filesystem.
  964 # See src/sys/ufs/ufs/README.acls for more information.
  965 options         UFS_ACL
  966 
  967 # Directory hashing improves the speed of operations on very large
  968 # directories at the expense of some memory.
  969 options         UFS_DIRHASH
  970 
  971 # Gjournal-based UFS journaling support.
  972 options         UFS_GJOURNAL
  973 
  974 # Make space in the kernel for a root filesystem on a md device.
  975 # Define to the number of kilobytes to reserve for the filesystem.
  976 options         MD_ROOT_SIZE=10
  977 
  978 # Make the md device a potential root device, either with preloaded
  979 # images of type mfs_root or md_root.
  980 options         MD_ROOT
  981 
  982 # Disk quotas are supported when this option is enabled.
  983 options         QUOTA                   #enable disk quotas
  984 
  985 # If you are running a machine just as a fileserver for PC and MAC
  986 # users, using SAMBA or Netatalk, you may consider setting this option
  987 # and keeping all those users' directories on a filesystem that is
  988 # mounted with the suiddir option. This gives new files the same
  989 # ownership as the directory (similar to group). It's a security hole
  990 # if you let these users run programs, so confine it to file-servers
  991 # (but it'll save you lots of headaches in those cases). Root owned
  992 # directories are exempt and X bits are cleared. The suid bit must be
  993 # set on the directory as well; see chmod(1) PC owners can't see/set
  994 # ownerships so they keep getting their toes trodden on. This saves
  995 # you all the support calls as the filesystem it's used on will act as
  996 # they expect: "It's my dir so it must be my file".
  997 #
  998 options         SUIDDIR
  999 
 1000 # NFS options:
 1001 options         NFS_MINATTRTIMO=3       # VREG attrib cache timeout in sec
 1002 options         NFS_MAXATTRTIMO=60
 1003 options         NFS_MINDIRATTRTIMO=30   # VDIR attrib cache timeout in sec
 1004 options         NFS_MAXDIRATTRTIMO=60
 1005 options         NFS_GATHERDELAY=10      # Default write gather delay (msec)
 1006 options         NFS_WDELAYHASHSIZ=16    # and with this
 1007 options         NFS_DEBUG               # Enable NFS Debugging
 1008 
 1009 # Coda stuff:
 1010 options         CODA                    #CODA filesystem.
 1011 device          vcoda                   #coda minicache <-> venus comm.
 1012 # Use the old Coda 5.x venus<->kernel interface instead of the new
 1013 # realms-aware 6.x protocol.
 1014 #options        CODA_COMPAT_5
 1015 
 1016 #
 1017 # Add support for the EXT2FS filesystem of Linux fame.  Be a bit
 1018 # careful with this - the ext2fs code has a tendency to lag behind
 1019 # changes and not be exercised very much, so mounting read/write could
 1020 # be dangerous (and even mounting read only could result in panics.)
 1021 #
 1022 options         EXT2FS
 1023 
 1024 #
 1025 # Add support for the ReiserFS filesystem (used in Linux). Currently,
 1026 # this is limited to read-only access.
 1027 #
 1028 options         REISERFS
 1029 
 1030 #
 1031 # Add support for the SGI XFS filesystem. Currently,
 1032 # this is limited to read-only access.
 1033 #
 1034 options         XFS
 1035 
 1036 # Use real implementations of the aio_* system calls.  There are numerous
 1037 # stability and security issues in the current aio code that make it
 1038 # unsuitable for inclusion on machines with untrusted local users.
 1039 options         VFS_AIO
 1040 
 1041 # Cryptographically secure random number generator; /dev/random
 1042 device          random
 1043 
 1044 # The system memory devices; /dev/mem, /dev/kmem
 1045 device          mem
 1046 
 1047 # Optional character code conversion support with LIBICONV.
 1048 # Each option requires their base file system and LIBICONV.
 1049 options         CD9660_ICONV
 1050 options         MSDOSFS_ICONV
 1051 options         NTFS_ICONV
 1052 options         UDF_ICONV
 1053 
 1054 
 1055 #####################################################################
 1056 # POSIX P1003.1B
 1057 
 1058 # Real time extensions added in the 1993 POSIX
 1059 # _KPOSIX_PRIORITY_SCHEDULING: Build in _POSIX_PRIORITY_SCHEDULING
 1060 
 1061 options         _KPOSIX_PRIORITY_SCHEDULING
 1062 # p1003_1b_semaphores are very experimental,
 1063 # user should be ready to assist in debugging if problems arise.
 1064 options         P1003_1B_SEMAPHORES
 1065 
 1066 # POSIX message queue
 1067 options         P1003_1B_MQUEUE
 1068 
 1069 #####################################################################
 1070 # SECURITY POLICY PARAMETERS
 1071 
 1072 # Support for BSM audit
 1073 options         AUDIT
 1074 
 1075 # Support for Mandatory Access Control (MAC):
 1076 options         MAC
 1077 options         MAC_BIBA
 1078 options         MAC_BSDEXTENDED
 1079 options         MAC_IFOFF
 1080 options         MAC_LOMAC
 1081 options         MAC_MLS
 1082 options         MAC_NONE
 1083 options         MAC_PARTITION
 1084 options         MAC_PORTACL
 1085 options         MAC_SEEOTHERUIDS
 1086 options         MAC_STUB
 1087 options         MAC_TEST
 1088 
 1089 
 1090 #####################################################################
 1091 # CLOCK OPTIONS
 1092 
 1093 # The granularity of operation is controlled by the kernel option HZ whose
 1094 # default value (1000 on most architectures) means a granularity of 1ms
 1095 # (1s/HZ).  Historically, the default was 100, but finer granularity is
 1096 # required for DUMMYNET and other systems on modern hardware.  There are
 1097 # reasonable arguments that HZ should, in fact, be 100 still; consider,
 1098 # that reducing the granularity too much might cause excessive overhead in
 1099 # clock interrupt processing, potentially causing ticks to be missed and thus
 1100 # actually reducing the accuracy of operation.
 1101 
 1102 options         HZ=100
 1103 
 1104 # Enable support for the kernel PLL to use an external PPS signal,
 1105 # under supervision of [x]ntpd(8)
 1106 # More info in ntpd documentation: http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~ntp
 1107 
 1108 options         PPS_SYNC
 1109 
 1110 
 1111 #####################################################################
 1112 # SCSI DEVICES
 1113 
 1114 # SCSI DEVICE CONFIGURATION
 1115 
 1116 # The SCSI subsystem consists of the `base' SCSI code, a number of
 1117 # high-level SCSI device `type' drivers, and the low-level host-adapter
 1118 # device drivers.  The host adapters are listed in the ISA and PCI
 1119 # device configuration sections below.
 1120 #
 1121 # It is possible to wire down your SCSI devices so that a given bus,
 1122 # target, and LUN always come on line as the same device unit.  In
 1123 # earlier versions the unit numbers were assigned in the order that
 1124 # the devices were probed on the SCSI bus.  This means that if you
 1125 # removed a disk drive, you may have had to rewrite your /etc/fstab
 1126 # file, and also that you had to be careful when adding a new disk
 1127 # as it may have been probed earlier and moved your device configuration
 1128 # around.  (See also option GEOM_VOL for a different solution to this
 1129 # problem.)
 1130 
 1131 # This old behavior is maintained as the default behavior.  The unit
 1132 # assignment begins with the first non-wired down unit for a device
 1133 # type.  For example, if you wire a disk as "da3" then the first
 1134 # non-wired disk will be assigned da4.
 1135 
 1136 # The syntax for wiring down devices is:
 1137 
 1138 hint.scbus.0.at="ahc0"
 1139 hint.scbus.1.at="ahc1"
 1140 hint.scbus.1.bus="0"
 1141 hint.scbus.3.at="ahc2"
 1142 hint.scbus.3.bus="0"
 1143 hint.scbus.2.at="ahc2"
 1144 hint.scbus.2.bus="1"
 1145 hint.da.0.at="scbus0"
 1146 hint.da.0.target="0"
 1147 hint.da.0.unit="0"
 1148 hint.da.1.at="scbus3"
 1149 hint.da.1.target="1"
 1150 hint.da.2.at="scbus2"
 1151 hint.da.2.target="3"
 1152 hint.sa.1.at="scbus1"
 1153 hint.sa.1.target="6"
 1154 
 1155 # "units" (SCSI logical unit number) that are not specified are
 1156 # treated as if specified as LUN 0.
 1157 
 1158 # All SCSI devices allocate as many units as are required.
 1159 
 1160 # The ch driver drives SCSI Media Changer ("jukebox") devices.
 1161 #
 1162 # The da driver drives SCSI Direct Access ("disk") and Optical Media
 1163 # ("WORM") devices.
 1164 #
 1165 # The sa driver drives SCSI Sequential Access ("tape") devices.
 1166 #
 1167 # The cd driver drives SCSI Read Only Direct Access ("cd") devices.
 1168 #
 1169 # The ses driver drives SCSI Environment Services ("ses") and
 1170 # SAF-TE ("SCSI Accessible Fault-Tolerant Enclosure") devices.
 1171 #
 1172 # The pt driver drives SCSI Processor devices.
 1173 #
 1174 # The sg driver provides a passthrough API that is compatible with the
 1175 # Linux SG driver.  It will work in conjunction with the COMPAT_LINUX
 1176 # option to run linux SG apps.  It can also stand on its own and provide
 1177 # source level API compatiblity for porting apps to FreeBSD.
 1178 #
 1179 # Target Mode support is provided here but also requires that a SIM
 1180 # (SCSI Host Adapter Driver) provide support as well.
 1181 #
 1182 # The targ driver provides target mode support as a Processor type device.
 1183 # It exists to give the minimal context necessary to respond to Inquiry
 1184 # commands. There is a sample user application that shows how the rest
 1185 # of the command support might be done in /usr/share/examples/scsi_target.
 1186 #
 1187 # The targbh driver provides target mode support and exists to respond
 1188 # to incoming commands that do not otherwise have a logical unit assigned
 1189 # to them.
 1190 #
 1191 # The "unknown" device (uk? in pre-2.0.5) is now part of the base SCSI
 1192 # configuration as the "pass" driver.
 1193 
 1194 device          scbus           #base SCSI code
 1195 device          ch              #SCSI media changers
 1196 device          da              #SCSI direct access devices (aka disks)
 1197 device          sa              #SCSI tapes
 1198 device          cd              #SCSI CD-ROMs
 1199 device          ses             #SCSI Environmental Services (and SAF-TE)
 1200 device          pt              #SCSI processor
 1201 device          targ            #SCSI Target Mode Code
 1202 device          targbh          #SCSI Target Mode Blackhole Device
 1203 device          pass            #CAM passthrough driver
 1204 device          sg              #Linux SCSI passthrough
 1205 
 1206 # CAM OPTIONS:
 1207 # debugging options:
 1208 # -- NOTE --  If you specify one of the bus/target/lun options, you must
 1209 #             specify them all!
 1210 # CAMDEBUG: When defined enables debugging macros
 1211 # CAM_DEBUG_BUS:  Debug the given bus.  Use -1 to debug all busses.
 1212 # CAM_DEBUG_TARGET:  Debug the given target.  Use -1 to debug all targets.
 1213 # CAM_DEBUG_LUN:  Debug the given lun.  Use -1 to debug all luns.
 1214 # CAM_DEBUG_FLAGS:  OR together CAM_DEBUG_INFO, CAM_DEBUG_TRACE,
 1215 #                   CAM_DEBUG_SUBTRACE, and CAM_DEBUG_CDB
 1216 #
 1217 # CAM_MAX_HIGHPOWER: Maximum number of concurrent high power (start unit) cmds
 1218 # SCSI_NO_SENSE_STRINGS: When defined disables sense descriptions
 1219 # SCSI_NO_OP_STRINGS: When defined disables opcode descriptions
 1220 # SCSI_DELAY: The number of MILLISECONDS to freeze the SIM (scsi adapter)
 1221 #             queue after a bus reset, and the number of milliseconds to
 1222 #             freeze the device queue after a bus device reset.  This
 1223 #             can be changed at boot and runtime with the
 1224 #             kern.cam.scsi_delay tunable/sysctl.
 1225 options         CAMDEBUG
 1226 options         CAM_DEBUG_BUS=-1
 1227 options         CAM_DEBUG_TARGET=-1
 1228 options         CAM_DEBUG_LUN=-1
 1229 options         CAM_DEBUG_FLAGS=(CAM_DEBUG_INFO|CAM_DEBUG_TRACE|CAM_DEBUG_CDB)
 1230 options         CAM_MAX_HIGHPOWER=4
 1231 options         SCSI_NO_SENSE_STRINGS
 1232 options         SCSI_NO_OP_STRINGS
 1233 options         SCSI_DELAY=5000 # Be pessimistic about Joe SCSI device
 1234 
 1235 # Options for the CAM CDROM driver:
 1236 # CHANGER_MIN_BUSY_SECONDS: Guaranteed minimum time quantum for a changer LUN
 1237 # CHANGER_MAX_BUSY_SECONDS: Maximum time quantum per changer LUN, only
 1238 #                           enforced if there is I/O waiting for another LUN
 1239 # The compiled in defaults for these variables are 2 and 10 seconds,
 1240 # respectively.
 1241 #
 1242 # These can also be changed on the fly with the following sysctl variables:
 1243 # kern.cam.cd.changer.min_busy_seconds
 1244 # kern.cam.cd.changer.max_busy_seconds
 1245 #
 1246 options         CHANGER_MIN_BUSY_SECONDS=2
 1247 options         CHANGER_MAX_BUSY_SECONDS=10
 1248 
 1249 # Options for the CAM sequential access driver:
 1250 # SA_IO_TIMEOUT: Timeout for read/write/wfm  operations, in minutes
 1251 # SA_SPACE_TIMEOUT: Timeout for space operations, in minutes
 1252 # SA_REWIND_TIMEOUT: Timeout for rewind operations, in minutes
 1253 # SA_ERASE_TIMEOUT: Timeout for erase operations, in minutes
 1254 # SA_1FM_AT_EOD: Default to model which only has a default one filemark at EOT.
 1255 options         SA_IO_TIMEOUT=4
 1256 options         SA_SPACE_TIMEOUT=60
 1257 options         SA_REWIND_TIMEOUT=(2*60)
 1258 options         SA_ERASE_TIMEOUT=(4*60)
 1259 options         SA_1FM_AT_EOD
 1260 
 1261 # Optional timeout for the CAM processor target (pt) device
 1262 # This is specified in seconds.  The default is 60 seconds.
 1263 options         SCSI_PT_DEFAULT_TIMEOUT=60
 1264 
 1265 # Optional enable of doing SES passthrough on other devices (e.g., disks)
 1266 #
 1267 # Normally disabled because a lot of newer SCSI disks report themselves
 1268 # as having SES capabilities, but this can then clot up attempts to build
 1269 # build a topology with the SES device that's on the box these drives
 1270 # are in....
 1271 options         SES_ENABLE_PASSTHROUGH
 1272 
 1273 
 1274 #####################################################################
 1275 # MISCELLANEOUS DEVICES AND OPTIONS
 1276 
 1277 # The `pty' device usually turns out to be ``effectively mandatory'',
 1278 # as it is required for `telnetd', `rlogind', `screen', `emacs', and
 1279 # `xterm', among others.
 1280 
 1281 device          pty             #Pseudo ttys
 1282 device          nmdm            #back-to-back tty devices
 1283 device          md              #Memory/malloc disk
 1284 device          snp             #Snoop device - to look at pty/vty/etc..
 1285 device          ccd             #Concatenated disk driver
 1286 device          firmware        #firmware(9) support
 1287 
 1288 # Kernel side iconv library
 1289 options         LIBICONV
 1290 
 1291 # Size of the kernel message buffer.  Should be N * pagesize.
 1292 options         MSGBUF_SIZE=40960
 1293 
 1294 # Maximum size of a tty or pty input buffer.
 1295 options         TTYHOG=8193
 1296 
 1297 
 1298 #####################################################################
 1299 # HARDWARE DEVICE CONFIGURATION
 1300 
 1301 # For ISA the required hints are listed.
 1302 # EISA, MCA, PCI, CardBus, SD/MMC and pccard are self identifying buses, so
 1303 # no hints are needed.
 1304 
 1305 #
 1306 # Mandatory devices:
 1307 #
 1308 
 1309 # These options are valid for other keyboard drivers as well.
 1310 options         KBD_DISABLE_KEYMAP_LOAD # refuse to load a keymap
 1311 options         KBD_INSTALL_CDEV        # install a CDEV entry in /dev
 1312 
 1313 options         FB_DEBUG                # Frame buffer debugging
 1314 
 1315 device          splash                  # Splash screen and screen saver support
 1316 
 1317 # Various screen savers.
 1318 device          blank_saver
 1319 device          daemon_saver
 1320 device          dragon_saver
 1321 device          fade_saver
 1322 device          fire_saver
 1323 device          green_saver
 1324 device          logo_saver
 1325 device          rain_saver
 1326 device          snake_saver
 1327 device          star_saver
 1328 device          warp_saver
 1329 
 1330 # The syscons console driver (SCO color console compatible).
 1331 device          sc
 1332 hint.sc.0.at="isa"
 1333 options         MAXCONS=16              # number of virtual consoles
 1334 options         SC_ALT_MOUSE_IMAGE      # simplified mouse cursor in text mode
 1335 options         SC_DFLT_FONT            # compile font in
 1336 makeoptions     SC_DFLT_FONT=cp850
 1337 options         SC_DISABLE_KDBKEY       # disable `debug' key
 1338 options         SC_DISABLE_REBOOT       # disable reboot key sequence
 1339 options         SC_HISTORY_SIZE=200     # number of history buffer lines
 1340 options         SC_MOUSE_CHAR=0x3       # char code for text mode mouse cursor
 1341 options         SC_PIXEL_MODE           # add support for the raster text mode
 1342 
 1343 # The following options will let you change the default colors of syscons.
 1344 options         SC_NORM_ATTR=(FG_GREEN|BG_BLACK)
 1345 options         SC_NORM_REV_ATTR=(FG_YELLOW|BG_GREEN)
 1346 options         SC_KERNEL_CONS_ATTR=(FG_RED|BG_BLACK)
 1347 options         SC_KERNEL_CONS_REV_ATTR=(FG_BLACK|BG_RED)
 1348 
 1349 # The following options will let you change the default behaviour of
 1350 # cut-n-paste feature
 1351 options         SC_CUT_SPACES2TABS      # convert leading spaces into tabs
 1352 options         SC_CUT_SEPCHARS=\"x09\" # set of characters that delimit words
 1353                                         # (default is single space - \"x20\")
 1354 
 1355 # If you have a two button mouse, you may want to add the following option
 1356 # to use the right button of the mouse to paste text.
 1357 options         SC_TWOBUTTON_MOUSE
 1358 
 1359 # You can selectively disable features in syscons.
 1360 options         SC_NO_CUTPASTE
 1361 options         SC_NO_FONT_LOADING
 1362 options         SC_NO_HISTORY
 1363 options         SC_NO_MODE_CHANGE
 1364 options         SC_NO_SYSMOUSE
 1365 options         SC_NO_SUSPEND_VTYSWITCH
 1366 
 1367 # `flags' for sc
 1368 #       0x80    Put the video card in the VESA 800x600 dots, 16 color mode
 1369 #       0x100   Probe for a keyboard device periodically if one is not present
 1370 
 1371 #
 1372 # Optional devices:
 1373 #
 1374 
 1375 #
 1376 # SCSI host adapters:
 1377 #
 1378 # adv: All Narrow SCSI bus AdvanSys controllers.
 1379 # adw: Second Generation AdvanSys controllers including the ADV940UW.
 1380 # aha: Adaptec 154x/1535/1640
 1381 # ahb: Adaptec 174x EISA controllers
 1382 # ahc: Adaptec 274x/284x/2910/293x/294x/394x/3950x/3960x/398X/4944/
 1383 #      19160x/29160x, aic7770/aic78xx
 1384 # ahd: Adaptec 29320/39320 Controllers.
 1385 # aic: Adaptec 6260/6360, APA-1460 (PC Card), NEC PC9801-100 (C-BUS)
 1386 # amd: Support for the AMD 53C974 SCSI host adapter chip as found on devices
 1387 #      such as the Tekram DC-390(T).
 1388 # bt:  Most Buslogic controllers: including BT-445, BT-54x, BT-64x, BT-74x,
 1389 #      BT-75x, BT-946, BT-948, BT-956, BT-958, SDC3211B, SDC3211F, SDC3222F
 1390 # esp: NCR53c9x.  Only for SBUS hardware right now.
 1391 # isp: Qlogic ISP 1020, 1040 and 1040B PCI SCSI host adapters,
 1392 #      ISP 1240 Dual Ultra SCSI, ISP 1080 and 1280 (Dual) Ultra2,
 1393 #      ISP 12160 Ultra3 SCSI,
 1394 #      Qlogic ISP 2100 and ISP 2200 1Gb Fibre Channel host adapters.
 1395 #      Qlogic ISP 2300 and ISP 2312 2Gb Fibre Channel host adapters.
 1396 #      Qlogic ISP 2322 and ISP 6322 2Gb Fibre Channel host adapters.
 1397 # ispfw: Firmware module for Qlogic host adapters
 1398 # mpt: LSI-Logic MPT/Fusion 53c1020 or 53c1030 Ultra4
 1399 #      or FC9x9 Fibre Channel host adapters.
 1400 # ncr: NCR 53C810, 53C825 self-contained SCSI host adapters.
 1401 # sym: Symbios/Logic 53C8XX family of PCI-SCSI I/O processors:
 1402 #      53C810, 53C810A, 53C815, 53C825,  53C825A, 53C860, 53C875,
 1403 #      53C876, 53C885,  53C895, 53C895A, 53C896,  53C897, 53C1510D,
 1404 #      53C1010-33, 53C1010-66.
 1405 # trm: Tekram DC395U/UW/F DC315U adapters.
 1406 # wds: WD7000
 1407 
 1408 #
 1409 # Note that the order is important in order for Buslogic ISA/EISA cards to be
 1410 # probed correctly.
 1411 #
 1412 device          bt
 1413 hint.bt.0.at="isa"
 1414 hint.bt.0.port="0x330"
 1415 device          adv
 1416 hint.adv.0.at="isa"
 1417 device          adw
 1418 device          aha
 1419 hint.aha.0.at="isa"
 1420 device          aic
 1421 hint.aic.0.at="isa"
 1422 device          ahb
 1423 device          ahc
 1424 device          ahd
 1425 device          amd
 1426 device          esp
 1427 device          iscsi_initiator
 1428 device          isp
 1429 hint.isp.0.disable="1"
 1430 hint.isp.0.role="3"
 1431 hint.isp.0.prefer_iomap="1"
 1432 hint.isp.0.prefer_memmap="1"
 1433 hint.isp.0.fwload_disable="1"
 1434 hint.isp.0.ignore_nvram="1"
 1435 hint.isp.0.fullduplex="1"
 1436 hint.isp.0.topology="lport"
 1437 hint.isp.0.topology="nport"
 1438 hint.isp.0.topology="lport-only"
 1439 hint.isp.0.topology="nport-only"
 1440 # we can't get u_int64_t types, nor can we get strings if it's got
 1441 # a leading 0x, hence this silly dodge.
 1442 hint.isp.0.portwnn="w50000000aaaa0000"
 1443 hint.isp.0.nodewnn="w50000000aaaa0001"
 1444 device          ispfw
 1445 device          mpt
 1446 device          ncr
 1447 device          sym
 1448 device          trm
 1449 device          wds
 1450 hint.wds.0.at="isa"
 1451 hint.wds.0.port="0x350"
 1452 hint.wds.0.irq="11"
 1453 hint.wds.0.drq="6"
 1454 
 1455 # The aic7xxx driver will attempt to use memory mapped I/O for all PCI
 1456 # controllers that have it configured only if this option is set. Unfortunately,
 1457 # this doesn't work on some motherboards, which prevents it from being the
 1458 # default.
 1459 options         AHC_ALLOW_MEMIO
 1460 
 1461 # Dump the contents of the ahc controller configuration PROM.
 1462 options         AHC_DUMP_EEPROM
 1463 
 1464 # Bitmap of units to enable targetmode operations.
 1465 options         AHC_TMODE_ENABLE
 1466 
 1467 # Compile in Aic7xxx Debugging code.
 1468 options         AHC_DEBUG
 1469 
 1470 # Aic7xxx driver debugging options. See sys/dev/aic7xxx/aic7xxx.h
 1471 options         AHC_DEBUG_OPTS
 1472 
 1473 # Print register bitfields in debug output.  Adds ~128k to driver
 1474 # See ahc(4).
 1475 options         AHC_REG_PRETTY_PRINT
 1476 
 1477 # Compile in aic79xx debugging code.
 1478 options         AHD_DEBUG
 1479 
 1480 # Aic79xx driver debugging options.  Adds ~215k to driver.  See ahd(4).
 1481 options         AHD_DEBUG_OPTS=0xFFFFFFFF
 1482 
 1483 # Print human-readable register definitions when debugging
 1484 options         AHD_REG_PRETTY_PRINT
 1485 
 1486 # Bitmap of units to enable targetmode operations.
 1487 options         AHD_TMODE_ENABLE
 1488 
 1489 # The adw driver will attempt to use memory mapped I/O for all PCI
 1490 # controllers that have it configured only if this option is set.
 1491 options         ADW_ALLOW_MEMIO
 1492 
 1493 # Options used in dev/iscsi (Software iSCSI stack)
 1494 #
 1495 options         ISCSI_INITIATOR_DEBUG=9
 1496 
 1497 # Options used in dev/isp/ (Qlogic SCSI/FC driver).
 1498 #
 1499 #       ISP_TARGET_MODE         -       enable target mode operation
 1500 #
 1501 options         ISP_TARGET_MODE=1
 1502 #
 1503 #       ISP_DEFAULT_ROLES       -       default role
 1504 #               none=0
 1505 #               target=1
 1506 #               initiator=2
 1507 #               both=3                  (not supported currently)
 1508 #
 1509 options         ISP_DEFAULT_ROLES=2
 1510 
 1511 # Options used in dev/sym/ (Symbios SCSI driver).
 1512 #options        SYM_SETUP_LP_PROBE_MAP  #-Low Priority Probe Map (bits)
 1513                                         # Allows the ncr to take precedence
 1514                                         # 1 (1<<0) -> 810a, 860
 1515                                         # 2 (1<<1) -> 825a, 875, 885, 895
 1516                                         # 4 (1<<2) -> 895a, 896, 1510d
 1517 #options        SYM_SETUP_SCSI_DIFF     #-HVD support for 825a, 875, 885
 1518                                         # disabled:0 (default), enabled:1
 1519 #options        SYM_SETUP_PCI_PARITY    #-PCI parity checking
 1520                                         # disabled:0, enabled:1 (default)
 1521 #options        SYM_SETUP_MAX_LUN       #-Number of LUNs supported
 1522                                         # default:8, range:[1..64]
 1523 
 1524 # The 'dpt' driver provides support for old DPT controllers (http://www.dpt.com/).
 1525 # These have hardware RAID-{0,1,5} support, and do multi-initiator I/O.
 1526 # The DPT controllers are commonly re-licensed under other brand-names -
 1527 # some controllers by Olivetti, Dec, HP, AT&T, SNI, AST, Alphatronic, NEC and
 1528 # Compaq are actually DPT controllers.
 1529 #
 1530 # See src/sys/dev/dpt for debugging and other subtle options.
 1531 #   DPT_MEASURE_PERFORMANCE Enables a set of (semi)invasive metrics. Various
 1532 #                           instruments are enabled.  The tools in
 1533 #                           /usr/sbin/dpt_* assume these to be enabled.
 1534 #   DPT_HANDLE_TIMEOUTS     Normally device timeouts are handled by the DPT.
 1535 #                           If you ant the driver to handle timeouts, enable
 1536 #                           this option.  If your system is very busy, this
 1537 #                           option will create more trouble than solve.
 1538 #   DPT_TIMEOUT_FACTOR      Used to compute the excessive amount of time to
 1539 #                           wait when timing out with the above option.
 1540 #  DPT_DEBUG_xxxx           These are controllable from sys/dev/dpt/dpt.h
 1541 #  DPT_LOST_IRQ             When enabled, will try, once per second, to catch
 1542 #                           any interrupt that got lost.  Seems to help in some
 1543 #                           DPT-firmware/Motherboard combinations.  Minimal
 1544 #                           cost, great benefit.
 1545 #  DPT_RESET_HBA            Make "reset" actually reset the controller
 1546 #                           instead of fudging it.  Only enable this if you
 1547 #                           are 100% certain you need it.
 1548 
 1549 device          dpt
 1550 
 1551 # DPT options
 1552 #!CAM# options  DPT_MEASURE_PERFORMANCE
 1553 #!CAM# options  DPT_HANDLE_TIMEOUTS
 1554 options         DPT_TIMEOUT_FACTOR=4
 1555 options         DPT_LOST_IRQ
 1556 options         DPT_RESET_HBA
 1557 
 1558 #
 1559 # Compaq "CISS" RAID controllers (SmartRAID 5* series)
 1560 # These controllers have a SCSI-like interface, and require the
 1561 # CAM infrastructure.
 1562 #
 1563 device          ciss
 1564 
 1565 #
 1566 # Intel Integrated RAID controllers.
 1567 # This driver was developed and is maintained by Intel.  Contacts
 1568 # at Intel for this driver are
 1569 # "Kannanthanam, Boji T" <boji.t.kannanthanam@intel.com> and
 1570 # "Leubner, Achim" <achim.leubner@intel.com>.
 1571 #
 1572 device          iir
 1573 
 1574 #
 1575 # Mylex AcceleRAID and eXtremeRAID controllers with v6 and later
 1576 # firmware.  These controllers have a SCSI-like interface, and require
 1577 # the CAM infrastructure.
 1578 #
 1579 device          mly
 1580 
 1581 #
 1582 # Compaq Smart RAID, Mylex DAC960 and AMI MegaRAID controllers.  Only
 1583 # one entry is needed; the code will find and configure all supported
 1584 # controllers.
 1585 #
 1586 device          ida             # Compaq Smart RAID
 1587 device          mlx             # Mylex DAC960
 1588 device          amr             # AMI MegaRAID
 1589 device          mfi             # LSI MegaRAID SAS
 1590 device          mfip            # LSI MegaRAID SAS passthrough, requires CAM
 1591 options         MFI_DEBUG
 1592 
 1593 #
 1594 # 3ware ATA RAID
 1595 #
 1596 device          twe             # 3ware ATA RAID
 1597 
 1598 #
 1599 # The 'ATA' driver supports all ATA and ATAPI devices, including PC Card
 1600 # devices. You only need one "device ata" for it to find all
 1601 # PCI and PC Card ATA/ATAPI devices on modern machines.
 1602 device          ata
 1603 device          atadisk         # ATA disk drives
 1604 device          ataraid         # ATA RAID drives
 1605 device          atapicd         # ATAPI CDROM drives
 1606 device          atapifd         # ATAPI floppy drives
 1607 device          atapist         # ATAPI tape drives
 1608 device          atapicam        # emulate ATAPI devices as SCSI ditto via CAM
 1609                                 # needs CAM to be present (scbus & pass)
 1610 #
 1611 # For older non-PCI, non-PnPBIOS systems, these are the hints lines to add:
 1612 hint.ata.0.at="isa"
 1613 hint.ata.0.port="0x1f0"
 1614 hint.ata.0.irq="14"
 1615 hint.ata.1.at="isa"
 1616 hint.ata.1.port="0x170"
 1617 hint.ata.1.irq="15"
 1618 
 1619 #
 1620 # The following options are valid on the ATA driver:
 1621 #
 1622 # ATA_STATIC_ID:        controller numbering is static ie depends on location
 1623 #                       else the device numbers are dynamically allocated.
 1624 
 1625 options         ATA_STATIC_ID
 1626 
 1627 #
 1628 # Standard floppy disk controllers and floppy tapes, supports
 1629 # the Y-E DATA External FDD (PC Card)
 1630 #
 1631 device          fdc
 1632 hint.fdc.0.at="isa"
 1633 hint.fdc.0.port="0x3F0"
 1634 hint.fdc.0.irq="6"
 1635 hint.fdc.0.drq="2"
 1636 #
 1637 # FDC_DEBUG enables floppy debugging.  Since the debug output is huge, you
 1638 # gotta turn it actually on by setting the variable fd_debug with DDB,
 1639 # however.
 1640 options         FDC_DEBUG
 1641 #
 1642 # Activate this line if you happen to have an Insight floppy tape.
 1643 # Probing them proved to be dangerous for people with floppy disks only,
 1644 # so it's "hidden" behind a flag:
 1645 #hint.fdc.0.flags="1"
 1646 
 1647 # Specify floppy devices
 1648 hint.fd.0.at="fdc0"
 1649 hint.fd.0.drive="0"
 1650 hint.fd.1.at="fdc0"
 1651 hint.fd.1.drive="1"
 1652 
 1653 #
 1654 # uart: newbusified driver for serial interfaces.  It consolidates the sio(4),
 1655 #       sab(4) and zs(4) drivers.
 1656 #
 1657 device          uart
 1658 
 1659 # Options for uart(4)
 1660 options         UART_PPS_ON_CTS         # Do time pulse capturing using CTS
 1661                                         # instead of DCD.
 1662 
 1663 # The following hint should only be used for pure ISA devices.  It is not
 1664 # needed otherwise.  Use of hints is strongly discouraged.
 1665 hint.uart.0.at="isa"
 1666 
 1667 # The following 3 hints are used when the UART is a system device (i.e., a
 1668 # console or debug port), but only on platforms that don't have any other
 1669 # means to pass the information to the kernel.  The unit number of the hint
 1670 # is only used to bundle the hints together.  There is no relation to the
 1671 # unit number of the probed UART.
 1672 hint.uart.0.port="0x3f8"
 1673 hint.uart.0.flags="0x10"
 1674 hint.uart.0.baud="115200"
 1675 
 1676 # `flags' for serial drivers that support consoles like sio(4) and uart(4):
 1677 #       0x10    enable console support for this unit.  Other console flags
 1678 #               (if applicable) are ignored unless this is set.  Enabling
 1679 #               console support does not make the unit the preferred console.
 1680 #               Boot with -h or set boot_serial=YES in the loader.  For sio(4)
 1681 #               specifically, the 0x20 flag can also be set (see above).
 1682 #               Currently, at most one unit can have console support; the
 1683 #               first one (in config file order) with this flag set is
 1684 #               preferred.  Setting this flag for sio0 gives the old behaviour.
 1685 #       0x80    use this port for serial line gdb support in ddb.  Also known
 1686 #               as debug port.
 1687 #
 1688 
 1689 # Options for serial drivers that support consoles:
 1690 options         BREAK_TO_DEBUGGER       # A BREAK on a serial console goes to
 1691                                         # ddb, if available.
 1692 
 1693 # Solaris implements a new BREAK which is initiated by a character
 1694 # sequence CR ~ ^b which is similar to a familiar pattern used on
 1695 # Sun servers by the Remote Console.
 1696 options         ALT_BREAK_TO_DEBUGGER
 1697 
 1698 # Serial Communications Controller
 1699 # Supports the Siemens SAB 82532 and Zilog Z8530 multi-channel
 1700 # communications controllers.
 1701 device          scc
 1702 
 1703 # PCI Universal Communications driver
 1704 # Supports various multi port PCI I/O cards.
 1705 device          puc
 1706 
 1707 #
 1708 # Network interfaces:
 1709 #
 1710 # MII bus support is required for some PCI 10/100 ethernet NICs,
 1711 # namely those which use MII-compliant transceivers or implement
 1712 # transceiver control interfaces that operate like an MII. Adding
 1713 # "device miibus" to the kernel config pulls in support for
 1714 # the generic miibus API and all of the PHY drivers, including a
 1715 # generic one for PHYs that aren't specifically handled by an
 1716 # individual driver.
 1717 device          miibus
 1718 
 1719 # ae:   Support for gigabit ethernet adapters based on the Attansic/Atheros
 1720 #       L2 PCI-Express FastEthernet controllers.
 1721 # an:   Aironet 4500/4800 802.11 wireless adapters. Supports the PCMCIA,
 1722 #       PCI and ISA varieties.
 1723 # awi:  Support for IEEE 802.11 PC Card devices using the AMD Am79C930 and
 1724 #       Harris (Intersil) Chipset with PCnetMobile firmware by AMD.
 1725 # age:  Support for gigabit ethernet adapters based on the Attansic/Atheros
 1726 #       L1 PCI express gigabit ethernet controllers.
 1727 # ale:  Support for Atheros AR8121/AR8113/AR8114 PCIe ethernet controllers.
 1728 # bce:  Broadcom NetXtreme II (BCM5706/BCM5708) PCI/PCIe Gigabit Ethernet
 1729 #       adapters.
 1730 # bfe:  Broadcom BCM4401 Ethernet adapter.
 1731 # bge:  Support for gigabit ethernet adapters based on the Broadcom
 1732 #       BCM570x family of controllers, including the 3Com 3c996-T,
 1733 #       the Netgear GA302T, the SysKonnect SK-9D21 and SK-9D41, and
 1734 #       the embedded gigE NICs on Dell PowerEdge 2550 servers.
 1735 # cm:   Arcnet SMC COM90c26 / SMC COM90c56
 1736 #       (and SMC COM90c66 in '56 compatibility mode) adapters.
 1737 # cnw:  Xircom CNW/Netware Airsurfer PC Card adapter
 1738 # dc:   Support for PCI fast ethernet adapters based on the DEC/Intel 21143
 1739 #       and various workalikes including:
 1740 #       the ADMtek AL981 Comet and AN985 Centaur, the ASIX Electronics
 1741 #       AX88140A and AX88141, the Davicom DM9100 and DM9102, the Lite-On
 1742 #       82c168 and 82c169 PNIC, the Lite-On/Macronix LC82C115 PNIC II
 1743 #       and the Macronix 98713/98713A/98715/98715A/98725 PMAC. This driver
 1744 #       replaces the old al, ax, dm, pn and mx drivers.  List of brands:
 1745 #       Digital DE500-BA, Kingston KNE100TX, D-Link DFE-570TX, SOHOware SFA110,
 1746 #       SVEC PN102-TX, CNet Pro110B, 120A, and 120B, Compex RL100-TX,
 1747 #       LinkSys LNE100TX, LNE100TX V2.0, Jaton XpressNet, Alfa Inc GFC2204,
 1748 #       KNE110TX.
 1749 # de:   Digital Equipment DC21040
 1750 # em:   Intel Pro/1000 Gigabit Ethernet 82542, 82543, 82544 based adapters.
 1751 # ep:   3Com 3C509, 3C529, 3C556, 3C562D, 3C563D, 3C572, 3C574X, 3C579, 3C589
 1752 #       and PC Card devices using these chipsets.
 1753 # ex:   Intel EtherExpress Pro/10 and other i82595-based adapters,
 1754 #       Olicom Ethernet PC Card devices.
 1755 # fe:   Fujitsu MB86960A/MB86965A Ethernet
 1756 # fea:  DEC DEFEA EISA FDDI adapter
 1757 # fpa:  Support for the Digital DEFPA PCI FDDI. `device fddi' is also needed.
 1758 # fxp:  Intel EtherExpress Pro/100B
 1759 #       (hint of prefer_iomap can be done to prefer I/O instead of Mem mapping)
 1760 # gem:  Apple GMAC/Sun ERI/Sun GEM
 1761 # hme:  Sun HME (Happy Meal Ethernet)
 1762 # jme:  JMicron JMC260 Fast Ethernet/JMC250 Gigabit Ethernet based adapters.
 1763 # le:   AMD Am7900 LANCE and Am79C9xx PCnet
 1764 # lge:  Support for PCI gigabit ethernet adapters based on the Level 1
 1765 #       LXT1001 NetCellerator chipset. This includes the D-Link DGE-500SX,
 1766 #       SMC TigerCard 1000 (SMC9462SX), and some Addtron cards.
 1767 # msk:  Support for gigabit ethernet adapters based on the Marvell/SysKonnect
 1768 #       Yukon II Gigabit controllers, including 88E8021, 88E8022, 88E8061,
 1769 #       88E8062, 88E8035, 88E8036, 88E8038, 88E8050, 88E8052, 88E8053,
 1770 #       88E8055, 88E8056 and D-Link 560T/550SX.
 1771 # lmc:  Support for the LMC/SBE wide-area network interface cards.
 1772 # my:   Myson Fast Ethernet (MTD80X, MTD89X)
 1773 # nge:  Support for PCI gigabit ethernet adapters based on the National
 1774 #       Semiconductor DP83820 and DP83821 chipset. This includes the
 1775 #       SMC EZ Card 1000 (SMC9462TX), D-Link DGE-500T, Asante FriendlyNet
 1776 #       GigaNIX 1000TA and 1000TPC, the Addtron AEG320T, the Surecom
 1777 #       EP-320G-TX and the Netgear GA622T.
 1778 # pcn:  Support for PCI fast ethernet adapters based on the AMD Am79c97x
 1779 #       PCnet-FAST, PCnet-FAST+, PCnet-FAST III, PCnet-PRO and PCnet-Home
 1780 #       chipsets. These can also be handled by the le(4) driver if the
 1781 #       pcn(4) driver is left out of the kernel. The le(4) driver does not
 1782 #       support the additional features like the MII bus and burst mode of
 1783 #       the PCnet-FAST and greater chipsets though.
 1784 # re:   RealTek 8139C+/8169/816xS/811xS/8101E PCI/PCIe Ethernet adapter
 1785 # rl:   Support for PCI fast ethernet adapters based on the RealTek 8129/8139
 1786 #       chipset.  Note that the RealTek driver defaults to using programmed
 1787 #       I/O to do register accesses because memory mapped mode seems to cause
 1788 #       severe lockups on SMP hardware.  This driver also supports the
 1789 #       Accton EN1207D `Cheetah' adapter, which uses a chip called
 1790 #       the MPX 5030/5038, which is either a RealTek in disguise or a
 1791 #       RealTek workalike.  Note that the D-Link DFE-530TX+ uses the RealTek
 1792 #       chipset and is supported by this driver, not the 'vr' driver.
 1793 # sf:   Support for Adaptec Duralink PCI fast ethernet adapters based on the
 1794 #       Adaptec AIC-6915 "starfire" controller.
 1795 #       This includes dual and quad port cards, as well as one 100baseFX card.
 1796 #       Most of these are 64-bit PCI devices, except for one single port
 1797 #       card which is 32-bit.
 1798 # sis:  Support for NICs based on the Silicon Integrated Systems SiS 900,
 1799 #       SiS 7016 and NS DP83815 PCI fast ethernet controller chips.
 1800 # sbsh: Support for Granch SBNI16 SHDSL modem PCI adapters
 1801 # sk:   Support for the SysKonnect SK-984x series PCI gigabit ethernet NICs.
 1802 #       This includes the SK-9841 and SK-9842 single port cards (single mode
 1803 #       and multimode fiber) and the SK-9843 and SK-9844 dual port cards
 1804 #       (also single mode and multimode).
 1805 #       The driver will autodetect the number of ports on the card and
 1806 #       attach each one as a separate network interface.
 1807 # sn:   Support for ISA and PC Card Ethernet devices using the
 1808 #       SMC91C90/92/94/95 chips.
 1809 # ste:  Sundance Technologies ST201 PCI fast ethernet controller, includes
 1810 #       the D-Link DFE-550TX.
 1811 # stge: Support for gigabit ethernet adapters based on the Sundance/Tamarack
 1812 #       TC9021 family of controllers, including the Sundance ST2021/ST2023,
 1813 #       the Sundance/Tamarack TC9021, the D-Link DL-4000 and ASUS NX1101.
 1814 # ti:   Support for PCI gigabit ethernet NICs based on the Alteon Networks
 1815 #       Tigon 1 and Tigon 2 chipsets.  This includes the Alteon AceNIC, the
 1816 #       3Com 3c985, the Netgear GA620 and various others.  Note that you will
 1817 #       probably want to bump up kern.ipc.nmbclusters a lot to use this driver.
 1818 # tl:   Support for the Texas Instruments TNETE100 series 'ThunderLAN'
 1819 #       cards and integrated ethernet controllers.  This includes several
 1820 #       Compaq Netelligent 10/100 cards and the built-in ethernet controllers
 1821 #       in several Compaq Prosignia, Proliant and Deskpro systems.  It also
 1822 #       supports several Olicom 10Mbps and 10/100 boards.
 1823 # tx:   SMC 9432 TX, BTX and FTX cards. (SMC EtherPower II series)
 1824 # txp:  Support for 3Com 3cR990 cards with the "Typhoon" chipset
 1825 # vr:   Support for various fast ethernet adapters based on the VIA
 1826 #       Technologies VT3043 `Rhine I' and VT86C100A `Rhine II' chips,
 1827 #       including the D-Link DFE530TX (see 'rl' for DFE530TX+), the Hawking
 1828 #       Technologies PN102TX, and the AOpen/Acer ALN-320.
 1829 # vx:   3Com 3C590 and 3C595
 1830 # wb:   Support for fast ethernet adapters based on the Winbond W89C840F chip.
 1831 #       Note: this is not the same as the Winbond W89C940F, which is a
 1832 #       NE2000 clone.
 1833 # wi:   Lucent WaveLAN/IEEE 802.11 PCMCIA adapters. Note: this supports both
 1834 #       the PCMCIA and ISA cards: the ISA card is really a PCMCIA to ISA
 1835 #       bridge with a PCMCIA adapter plugged into it.
 1836 # xe:   Xircom/Intel EtherExpress Pro100/16 PC Card ethernet controller,
 1837 #       Accton Fast EtherCard-16, Compaq Netelligent 10/100 PC Card,
 1838 #       Toshiba 10/100 Ethernet PC Card, Xircom 16-bit Ethernet + Modem 56
 1839 # xl:   Support for the 3Com 3c900, 3c905, 3c905B and 3c905C (Fast)
 1840 #       Etherlink XL cards and integrated controllers.  This includes the
 1841 #       integrated 3c905B-TX chips in certain Dell Optiplex and Dell
 1842 #       Precision desktop machines and the integrated 3c905-TX chips
 1843 #       in Dell Latitude laptop docking stations.
 1844 #       Also supported: 3Com 3c980(C)-TX, 3Com 3cSOHO100-TX, 3Com 3c450-TX
 1845 
 1846 # Order for ISA/EISA devices is important here
 1847 
 1848 device          cm
 1849 hint.cm.0.at="isa"
 1850 hint.cm.0.port="0x2e0"
 1851 hint.cm.0.irq="9"
 1852 hint.cm.0.maddr="0xdc000"
 1853 device          ep
 1854 device          ex
 1855 device          fe
 1856 hint.fe.0.at="isa"
 1857 hint.fe.0.port="0x300"
 1858 device          fea
 1859 device          sn
 1860 hint.sn.0.at="isa"
 1861 hint.sn.0.port="0x300"
 1862 hint.sn.0.irq="10"
 1863 device          an
 1864 device          awi
 1865 device          cnw
 1866 device          wi
 1867 device          xe
 1868 
 1869 # PCI Ethernet NICs that use the common MII bus controller code.
 1870 device          ae              # Attansic/Atheros L2 FastEthernet
 1871 device          age             # Attansic/Atheros L1 Gigabit Ethernet
 1872 device          ale             # Atheros AR8121/AR8113/AR8114 Ethernet
 1873 device          bce             # Broadcom BCM5706/BCM5708 Gigabit Ethernet
 1874 device          bfe             # Broadcom BCM440x 10/100 Ethernet
 1875 device          bge             # Broadcom BCM570xx Gigabit Ethernet
 1876 device          cxgb            # Chelsio T3 10 Gigabit Ethernet
 1877 device          dc              # DEC/Intel 21143 and various workalikes
 1878 device          et              # Agere ET1310 10/100/Gigabit Ethernet
 1879 device          fxp             # Intel EtherExpress PRO/100B (82557, 82558)
 1880 hint.fxp.0.prefer_iomap="0"
 1881 device          gem             # Apple GMAC/Sun ERI/Sun GEM
 1882 device          hme             # Sun HME (Happy Meal Ethernet)
 1883 device          jme             # JMicron JMC250 Gigabit/JMC260 Fast Ethernet
 1884 device          lge             # Level 1 LXT1001 gigabit Ethernet
 1885 device          msk             # Marvell/SysKonnect Yukon II Gigabit Ethernet
 1886 device          my              # Myson Fast Ethernet (MTD80X, MTD89X)
 1887 device          nge             # NatSemi DP83820 gigabit Ethernet
 1888 device          re              # RealTek 8139C+/8169/8169S/8110S
 1889 device          rl              # RealTek 8129/8139
 1890 device          pcn             # AMD Am79C97x PCI 10/100 NICs
 1891 device          sf              # Adaptec AIC-6915 (``Starfire'')
 1892 device          sbsh            # Granch SBNI16 SHDSL modem
 1893 device          sis             # Silicon Integrated Systems SiS 900/SiS 7016
 1894 device          sk              # SysKonnect SK-984x & SK-982x gigabit Ethernet
 1895 device          ste             # Sundance ST201 (D-Link DFE-550TX)
 1896 device          stge            # Sundance/Tamarack TC9021 gigabit Ethernet
 1897 device          ti              # Alteon Networks Tigon I/II gigabit Ethernet
 1898 device          tl              # Texas Instruments ThunderLAN
 1899 device          tx              # SMC EtherPower II (83c170 ``EPIC'')
 1900 device          vr              # VIA Rhine, Rhine II
 1901 device          wb              # Winbond W89C840F
 1902 device          xl              # 3Com 3c90x (``Boomerang'', ``Cyclone'')
 1903 
 1904 # PCI Ethernet NICs.
 1905 device          de              # DEC/Intel DC21x4x (``Tulip'')
 1906 device          le              # AMD Am7900 LANCE and Am79C9xx PCnet
 1907 device          mxge            # Myricom Myri-10G 10GbE NIC
 1908 device          nxge            # Neterion Xframe 10GbE Server/Storage Adapter
 1909 device          txp             # 3Com 3cR990 (``Typhoon'')
 1910 device          vx              # 3Com 3c590, 3c595 (``Vortex'')
 1911 
 1912 # PCI FDDI NICs.
 1913 device          fpa
 1914 
 1915 # PCI WAN adapters.
 1916 device          lmc
 1917 
 1918 # Use "private" jumbo buffers allocated exclusively for the ti(4) driver.
 1919 # This option is incompatible with the TI_JUMBO_HDRSPLIT option below.
 1920 #options        TI_PRIVATE_JUMBOS
 1921 # Turn on the header splitting option for the ti(4) driver firmware.  This
 1922 # only works for Tigon II chips, and has no effect for Tigon I chips.
 1923 options         TI_JUMBO_HDRSPLIT
 1924 
 1925 # These two options allow manipulating the mbuf cluster size and mbuf size,
 1926 # respectively.  Be very careful with NIC driver modules when changing
 1927 # these from their default values, because that can potentially cause a
 1928 # mismatch between the mbuf size assumed by the kernel and the mbuf size
 1929 # assumed by a module.  The only driver that currently has the ability to
 1930 # detect a mismatch is ti(4).
 1931 options         MCLSHIFT=12     # mbuf cluster shift in bits, 12 == 4KB
 1932 options         MSIZE=512       # mbuf size in bytes
 1933 
 1934 #
 1935 # ATM related options (Cranor version)
 1936 # (note: this driver cannot be used with the HARP ATM stack)
 1937 #
 1938 # The `en' device provides support for Efficient Networks (ENI)
 1939 # ENI-155 PCI midway cards, and the Adaptec 155Mbps PCI ATM cards (ANA-59x0).
 1940 #
 1941 # The `hatm' device provides support for Fore/Marconi HE155 and HE622
 1942 # ATM PCI cards.
 1943 #
 1944 # The `fatm' device provides support for Fore PCA200E ATM PCI cards.
 1945 #
 1946 # The `patm' device provides support for IDT77252 based cards like
 1947 # ProSum's ProATM-155 and ProATM-25 and IDT's evaluation boards.
 1948 #
 1949 # atm device provides generic atm functions and is required for
 1950 # atm devices.
 1951 # NATM enables the netnatm protocol family that can be used to
 1952 # bypass TCP/IP.
 1953 #
 1954 # utopia provides the access to the ATM PHY chips and is required for en,
 1955 # hatm and fatm.
 1956 #
 1957 # the current driver supports only PVC operations (no atm-arp, no multicast).
 1958 # for more details, please read the original documents at
 1959 # http://www.ccrc.wustl.edu/pub/chuck/tech/bsdatm/bsdatm.html
 1960 #
 1961 device          atm
 1962 device          en
 1963 device          fatm                    #Fore PCA200E
 1964 device          hatm                    #Fore/Marconi HE155/622
 1965 device          patm                    #IDT77252 cards (ProATM and IDT)
 1966 device          utopia                  #ATM PHY driver
 1967 options         NATM                    #native ATM
 1968 
 1969 options         LIBMBPOOL               #needed by patm, iatm
 1970 
 1971 #
 1972 # Sound drivers
 1973 #
 1974 # sound: The generic sound driver.
 1975 #
 1976 
 1977 device          sound
 1978 
 1979 #
 1980 # snd_*: Device-specific drivers.
 1981 #
 1982 # The flags of the device tells the device a bit more info about the
 1983 # device that normally is obtained through the PnP interface.
 1984 #       bit  2..0   secondary DMA channel;
 1985 #       bit  4      set if the board uses two dma channels;
 1986 #       bit 15..8   board type, overrides autodetection; leave it
 1987 #                   zero if don't know what to put in (and you don't,
 1988 #                   since this is unsupported at the moment...).
 1989 #
 1990 # snd_ad1816:           Analog Devices AD1816 ISA PnP/non-PnP.
 1991 # snd_als4000:          Avance Logic ALS4000 PCI.
 1992 # snd_atiixp:           ATI IXP 200/300/400 PCI.
 1993 # snd_au88x0            Aureal Vortex 1/2/Advantage PCI. This driver
 1994 #                       lacks support for playback and recording.
 1995 # snd_audiocs:          Crystal Semiconductor CS4231 SBus/EBus. Only
 1996 #                       for sparc64.
 1997 # snd_cmi:              CMedia CMI8338/CMI8738 PCI.
 1998 # snd_cs4281:           Crystal Semiconductor CS4281 PCI.
 1999 # snd_csa:              Crystal Semiconductor CS461x/428x PCI. (except
 2000 #                       4281)
 2001 # snd_ds1:              Yamaha DS-1 PCI.
 2002 # snd_emu10k1:          Creative EMU10K1 PCI and EMU10K2 (Audigy) PCI.
 2003 # snd_emu10kx:          Creative SoundBlaster Live! and Audigy
 2004 # snd_envy24:           VIA Envy24 and compatible, needs snd_spicds.
 2005 # snd_envy24ht:         VIA Envy24HT and compatible, needs snd_spicds.
 2006 # snd_es137x:           Ensoniq AudioPCI ES137x PCI.
 2007 # snd_ess:              Ensoniq ESS ISA PnP/non-PnP, to be used in
 2008 #                       conjunction with snd_sbc.
 2009 # snd_fm801:            Forte Media FM801 PCI.
 2010 # snd_gusc:             Gravis UltraSound ISA PnP/non-PnP.
 2011 # snd_hda:              Intel High Definition Audio (Controller) and
 2012 #                       compatible.
 2013 # snd_ich:              Intel ICH PCI and some more audio controllers
 2014 #                       embedded in a chipset, for example nVidia
 2015 #                       nForce controllers.
 2016 # snd_maestro:          ESS Technology Maestro-1/2x PCI.
 2017 # snd_maestro3:         ESS Technology Maestro-3/Allegro PCI.
 2018 # snd_mss:              Microsoft Sound System ISA PnP/non-PnP.
 2019 # snd_neomagic:         Neomagic 256 AV/ZX PCI.
 2020 # snd_sb16:             Creative SoundBlaster16, to be used in
 2021 #                       conjunction with snd_sbc.
 2022 # snd_sb8:              Creative SoundBlaster (pre-16), to be used in
 2023 #                       conjunction with snd_sbc.
 2024 # snd_sbc:              Creative SoundBlaster ISA PnP/non-PnP.
 2025 #                       Supports ESS and Avance ISA chips as well.
 2026 # snd_spicds:           SPI codec driver, needed by Envy24/Envy24HT drivers.
 2027 # snd_solo:             ESS Solo-1x PCI.
 2028 # snd_t4dwave:          Trident 4DWave DX/NX PCI, Sis 7018 PCI and Acer Labs
 2029 #                       M5451 PCI.
 2030 # snd_via8233:          VIA VT8233x PCI.
 2031 # snd_via82c686:        VIA VT82C686A PCI.
 2032 # snd_vibes:            S3 Sonicvibes PCI.
 2033 # snd_uaudio:           USB audio.
 2034 
 2035 device          snd_ad1816
 2036 device          snd_als4000
 2037 device          snd_atiixp
 2038 #device         snd_au88x0
 2039 #device         snd_audiocs
 2040 device          snd_cmi
 2041 device          snd_cs4281
 2042 device          snd_csa
 2043 device          snd_ds1
 2044 device          snd_emu10k1
 2045 device          snd_emu10kx
 2046 device          snd_envy24
 2047 device          snd_envy24ht
 2048 device          snd_es137x
 2049 device          snd_ess
 2050 device          snd_fm801
 2051 device          snd_gusc
 2052 device          snd_hda
 2053 device          snd_ich
 2054 device          snd_maestro
 2055 device          snd_maestro3
 2056 device          snd_mss
 2057 device          snd_neomagic
 2058 device          snd_sb16
 2059 device          snd_sb8
 2060 device          snd_sbc
 2061 device          snd_solo
 2062 device          snd_spicds
 2063 device          snd_t4dwave
 2064 device          snd_via8233
 2065 device          snd_via82c686
 2066 device          snd_vibes
 2067 device          snd_uaudio
 2068 
 2069 # For non-PnP sound cards:
 2070 hint.pcm.0.at="isa"
 2071 hint.pcm.0.irq="10"
 2072 hint.pcm.0.drq="1"
 2073 hint.pcm.0.flags="0x0"
 2074 hint.sbc.0.at="isa"
 2075 hint.sbc.0.port="0x220"
 2076 hint.sbc.0.irq="5"
 2077 hint.sbc.0.drq="1"
 2078 hint.sbc.0.flags="0x15"
 2079 hint.gusc.0.at="isa"
 2080 hint.gusc.0.port="0x220"
 2081 hint.gusc.0.irq="5"
 2082 hint.gusc.0.drq="1"
 2083 hint.gusc.0.flags="0x13"
 2084 
 2085 #
 2086 # IEEE-488 hardware:
 2087 # pcii:         PCIIA cards (uPD7210 based isa cards)
 2088 # tnt4882:      National Instruments PCI-GPIB card.
 2089 
 2090 device  pcii
 2091 hint.pcii.0.at="isa"
 2092 hint.pcii.0.port="0x2e1"
 2093 hint.pcii.0.irq="5"
 2094 hint.pcii.0.drq="1"
 2095 
 2096 device  tnt4882
 2097 
 2098 #
 2099 # Miscellaneous hardware:
 2100 #
 2101 # scd: Sony CD-ROM using proprietary (non-ATAPI) interface
 2102 # mcd: Mitsumi CD-ROM using proprietary (non-ATAPI) interface
 2103 # bktr: Brooktree bt848/848a/849a/878/879 video capture and TV Tuner board
 2104 # cy: Cyclades serial driver
 2105 # joy: joystick (including IO DATA PCJOY PC Card joystick)
 2106 # rc: RISCom/8 multiport card
 2107 # rp: Comtrol Rocketport(ISA/PCI) - single card
 2108 # si: Specialix SI/XIO 4-32 port terminal multiplexor
 2109 # cmx: OmniKey CardMan 4040 pccard smartcard reader
 2110 
 2111 # Notes on the Comtrol Rocketport driver:
 2112 #
 2113 # The exact values used for rp0 depend on how many boards you have
 2114 # in the system.  The manufacturer's sample configs are listed as:
 2115 #
 2116 #               device  rp      # core driver support
 2117 #
 2118 #   Comtrol Rocketport ISA single card
 2119 #               hint.rp.0.at="isa"
 2120 #               hint.rp.0.port="0x280"
 2121 #
 2122 #   If instead you have two ISA cards, one installed at 0x100 and the
 2123 #   second installed at 0x180, then you should add the following to
 2124 #   your kernel probe hints:
 2125 #               hint.rp.0.at="isa"
 2126 #               hint.rp.0.port="0x100"
 2127 #               hint.rp.1.at="isa"
 2128 #               hint.rp.1.port="0x180"
 2129 #
 2130 #   For 4 ISA cards, it might be something like this:
 2131 #               hint.rp.0.at="isa"
 2132 #               hint.rp.0.port="0x180"
 2133 #               hint.rp.1.at="isa"
 2134 #               hint.rp.1.port="0x100"
 2135 #               hint.rp.2.at="isa"
 2136 #               hint.rp.2.port="0x340"
 2137 #               hint.rp.3.at="isa"
 2138 #               hint.rp.3.port="0x240"
 2139 #
 2140 #   For PCI cards, you need no hints.
 2141 
 2142 # Mitsumi CD-ROM
 2143 device          mcd
 2144 hint.mcd.0.at="isa"
 2145 hint.mcd.0.port="0x300"
 2146 # for the Sony CDU31/33A CDROM
 2147 device          scd
 2148 hint.scd.0.at="isa"
 2149 hint.scd.0.port="0x230"
 2150 device          joy                     # PnP aware, hints for non-PnP only
 2151 hint.joy.0.at="isa"
 2152 hint.joy.0.port="0x201"
 2153 device          rc
 2154 hint.rc.0.at="isa"
 2155 hint.rc.0.port="0x220"
 2156 hint.rc.0.irq="12"
 2157 device          rp
 2158 hint.rp.0.at="isa"
 2159 hint.rp.0.port="0x280"
 2160 device          si
 2161 options         SI_DEBUG
 2162 hint.si.0.at="isa"
 2163 hint.si.0.maddr="0xd0000"
 2164 hint.si.0.irq="12"
 2165 device          cmx
 2166 
 2167 #
 2168 # The 'bktr' device is a PCI video capture device using the Brooktree
 2169 # bt848/bt848a/bt849a/bt878/bt879 chipset. When used with a TV Tuner it forms a
 2170 # TV card, e.g. Miro PC/TV, Hauppauge WinCast/TV WinTV, VideoLogic Captivator,
 2171 # Intel Smart Video III, AverMedia, IMS Turbo, FlyVideo.
 2172 #
 2173 # options       OVERRIDE_CARD=xxx
 2174 # options       OVERRIDE_TUNER=xxx
 2175 # options       OVERRIDE_MSP=1
 2176 # options       OVERRIDE_DBX=1
 2177 # These options can be used to override the auto detection
 2178 # The current values for xxx are found in src/sys/dev/bktr/bktr_card.h
 2179 # Using sysctl(8) run-time overrides on a per-card basis can be made
 2180 #
 2181 # options       BROOKTREE_SYSTEM_DEFAULT=BROOKTREE_PAL
 2182 # or
 2183 # options       BROOKTREE_SYSTEM_DEFAULT=BROOKTREE_NTSC
 2184 # Specifies the default video capture mode.
 2185 # This is required for Dual Crystal (28&35Mhz) boards where PAL is used
 2186 # to prevent hangs during initialisation, e.g. VideoLogic Captivator PCI.
 2187 #
 2188 # options       BKTR_USE_PLL
 2189 # This is required for PAL or SECAM boards with a 28Mhz crystal and no 35Mhz
 2190 # crystal, e.g. some new Bt878 cards.
 2191 #
 2192 # options       BKTR_GPIO_ACCESS
 2193 # This enable IOCTLs which give user level access to the GPIO port.
 2194 #
 2195 # options       BKTR_NO_MSP_RESET
 2196 # Prevents the MSP34xx reset. Good if you initialise the MSP in another OS first
 2197 #
 2198 # options       BKTR_430_FX_MODE
 2199 # Switch Bt878/879 cards into Intel 430FX chipset compatibility mode.
 2200 #
 2201 # options       BKTR_SIS_VIA_MODE
 2202 # Switch Bt878/879 cards into SIS/VIA chipset compatibility mode which is
 2203 # needed for some old SiS and VIA chipset motherboards.
 2204 # This also allows Bt878/879 chips to work on old OPTi (<1997) chipset
 2205 # motherboards and motherboards with bad or incomplete PCI 2.1 support.
 2206 # As a rough guess, old = before 1998
 2207 #
 2208 # options       BKTR_NEW_MSP34XX_DRIVER
 2209 # Use new, more complete initialization scheme for the msp34* soundchip.
 2210 # Should fix stereo autodetection if the old driver does only output
 2211 # mono sound.
 2212 
 2213 #
 2214 # options       BKTR_USE_FREEBSD_SMBUS
 2215 # Compile with FreeBSD SMBus implementation
 2216 #
 2217 # Brooktree driver has been ported to the new I2C framework. Thus,
 2218 # you'll need to have the following 3 lines in the kernel config.
 2219 #     device smbus
 2220 #     device iicbus
 2221 #     device iicbb
 2222 #     device iicsmb
 2223 # The iic and smb devices are only needed if you want to control other
 2224 # I2C slaves connected to the external connector of some cards.
 2225 #
 2226 device          bktr
 2227 
 2228 #
 2229 # PC Card/PCMCIA and Cardbus
 2230 #
 2231 # cbb: pci/cardbus bridge implementing YENTA interface
 2232 # pccard: pccard slots
 2233 # cardbus: cardbus slots
 2234 device          cbb
 2235 device          pccard
 2236 device          cardbus
 2237 
 2238 #
 2239 # MMC/SD
 2240 #
 2241 # mmc: mmc bus
 2242 # mmcsd: mmc memory and sd cards.
 2243 #device         mmc
 2244 #device         mmcsd
 2245 
 2246 #
 2247 # SMB bus
 2248 #
 2249 # System Management Bus support is provided by the 'smbus' device.
 2250 # Access to the SMBus device is via the 'smb' device (/dev/smb*),
 2251 # which is a child of the 'smbus' device.
 2252 #
 2253 # Supported devices:
 2254 # smb           standard I/O through /dev/smb*
 2255 #
 2256 # Supported SMB interfaces:
 2257 # iicsmb        I2C to SMB bridge with any iicbus interface
 2258 # bktr          brooktree848 I2C hardware interface
 2259 # intpm         Intel PIIX4 (82371AB, 82443MX) Power Management Unit
 2260 # alpm          Acer Aladdin-IV/V/Pro2 Power Management Unit
 2261 # ichsmb        Intel ICH SMBus controller chips (82801AA, 82801AB, 82801BA)
 2262 # viapm         VIA VT82C586B/596B/686A and VT8233 Power Management Unit
 2263 # amdpm         AMD 756 Power Management Unit
 2264 # amdsmb        AMD 8111 SMBus 2.0 Controller
 2265 # nfpm          NVIDIA nForce Power Management Unit
 2266 # nfsmb         NVIDIA nForce2/3/4 MCP SMBus 2.0 Controller
 2267 #
 2268 device          smbus           # Bus support, required for smb below.
 2269 
 2270 device          intpm
 2271 device          alpm
 2272 device          ichsmb
 2273 device          viapm
 2274 device          amdpm
 2275 device          amdsmb
 2276 device          nfpm
 2277 device          nfsmb
 2278 
 2279 device          smb
 2280 
 2281 #
 2282 # I2C Bus
 2283 #
 2284 # Philips i2c bus support is provided by the `iicbus' device.
 2285 #
 2286 # Supported devices:
 2287 # ic    i2c network interface
 2288 # iic   i2c standard io
 2289 # iicsmb i2c to smb bridge. Allow i2c i/o with smb commands.
 2290 #
 2291 # Supported interfaces:
 2292 # bktr  brooktree848 I2C software interface
 2293 #
 2294 # Other:
 2295 # iicbb generic I2C bit-banging code (needed by lpbb, bktr)
 2296 #
 2297 device          iicbus          # Bus support, required for ic/iic/iicsmb below.
 2298 device          iicbb
 2299 
 2300 device          ic
 2301 device          iic
 2302 device          iicsmb          # smb over i2c bridge
 2303 
 2304 # Parallel-Port Bus
 2305 #
 2306 # Parallel port bus support is provided by the `ppbus' device.
 2307 # Multiple devices may be attached to the parallel port, devices
 2308 # are automatically probed and attached when found.
 2309 #
 2310 # Supported devices:
 2311 # vpo   Iomega Zip Drive
 2312 #       Requires SCSI disk support ('scbus' and 'da'), best
 2313 #       performance is achieved with ports in EPP 1.9 mode.
 2314 # lpt   Parallel Printer
 2315 # plip  Parallel network interface
 2316 # ppi   General-purpose I/O ("Geek Port") + IEEE1284 I/O
 2317 # pps   Pulse per second Timing Interface
 2318 # lpbb  Philips official parallel port I2C bit-banging interface
 2319 #
 2320 # Supported interfaces:
 2321 # ppc   ISA-bus parallel port interfaces.
 2322 #
 2323 
 2324 options         PPC_PROBE_CHIPSET # Enable chipset specific detection
 2325                                   # (see flags in ppc(4))
 2326 options         DEBUG_1284      # IEEE1284 signaling protocol debug
 2327 options         PERIPH_1284     # Makes your computer act as an IEEE1284
 2328                                 # compliant peripheral
 2329 options         DONTPROBE_1284  # Avoid boot detection of PnP parallel devices
 2330 options         VP0_DEBUG       # ZIP/ZIP+ debug
 2331 options         LPT_DEBUG       # Printer driver debug
 2332 options         PPC_DEBUG       # Parallel chipset level debug
 2333 options         PLIP_DEBUG      # Parallel network IP interface debug
 2334 options         PCFCLOCK_VERBOSE         # Verbose pcfclock driver
 2335 options         PCFCLOCK_MAX_RETRIES=5   # Maximum read tries (default 10)
 2336 
 2337 device          ppc
 2338 hint.ppc.0.at="isa"
 2339 hint.ppc.0.irq="7"
 2340 device          ppbus
 2341 device          vpo
 2342 device          lpt
 2343 device          plip
 2344 device          ppi
 2345 device          pps
 2346 device          lpbb
 2347 device          pcfclock
 2348 
 2349 # Kernel BOOTP support
 2350 
 2351 options         BOOTP           # Use BOOTP to obtain IP address/hostname
 2352                                 # Requires NFSCLIENT and NFS_ROOT
 2353 options         BOOTP_NFSROOT   # NFS mount root filesystem using BOOTP info
 2354 options         BOOTP_NFSV3     # Use NFS v3 to NFS mount root
 2355 options         BOOTP_COMPAT    # Workaround for broken bootp daemons.
 2356 options         BOOTP_WIRED_TO=fxp0 # Use interface fxp0 for BOOTP
 2357 
 2358 #
 2359 # Add software watchdog routines.
 2360 #
 2361 options         SW_WATCHDOG
 2362 
 2363 #
 2364 # Disable swapping of stack pages.  This option removes all
 2365 # code which actually performs swapping, so it's not possible to turn
 2366 # it back on at run-time.
 2367 #
 2368 # This is sometimes usable for systems which don't have any swap space
 2369 # (see also sysctls "vm.defer_swapspace_pageouts" and
 2370 # "vm.disable_swapspace_pageouts")
 2371 #
 2372 #options        NO_SWAPPING
 2373 
 2374 # Set the number of sf_bufs to allocate. sf_bufs are virtual buffers
 2375 # for sendfile(2) that are used to map file VM pages, and normally
 2376 # default to a quantity that is roughly 16*MAXUSERS+512. You would
 2377 # typically want about 4 of these for each simultaneous file send.
 2378 #
 2379 options         NSFBUFS=1024
 2380 
 2381 #
 2382 # Enable extra debugging code for locks.  This stores the filename and
 2383 # line of whatever acquired the lock in the lock itself, and change a
 2384 # number of function calls to pass around the relevant data.  This is
 2385 # not at all useful unless you are debugging lock code.  Also note
 2386 # that it is likely to break e.g. fstat(1) unless you recompile your
 2387 # userland with -DDEBUG_LOCKS as well.
 2388 #
 2389 options         DEBUG_LOCKS
 2390 
 2391 
 2392 #####################################################################
 2393 # USB support
 2394 # UHCI controller
 2395 device          uhci
 2396 # OHCI controller
 2397 device          ohci
 2398 # EHCI controller
 2399 device          ehci
 2400 # SL811 Controller
 2401 device          slhci
 2402 # General USB code (mandatory for USB)
 2403 device          usb
 2404 #
 2405 # USB Double Bulk Pipe devices
 2406 device          udbp
 2407 # USB Fm Radio
 2408 device          ufm
 2409 # Generic USB device driver
 2410 device          ugen
 2411 # Human Interface Device (anything with buttons and dials)
 2412 device          uhid
 2413 # USB keyboard
 2414 device          ukbd
 2415 # USB printer
 2416 device          ulpt
 2417 # USB Iomega Zip 100 Drive (Requires scbus and da)
 2418 device          umass
 2419 # USB support for Belkin F5U109 and Magic Control Technology serial adapters
 2420 device          umct
 2421 # USB modem support
 2422 device          umodem
 2423 # USB mouse
 2424 device          ums
 2425 # Diamond Rio 500 MP3 player
 2426 device          urio
 2427 # USB scanners
 2428 device          uscanner
 2429 #
 2430 # USB serial support
 2431 device          ucom
 2432 # USB support for Technologies ARK3116 based serial adapters
 2433 device          uark
 2434 # USB support for Belkin F5U103 and compatible serial adapters
 2435 device          ubsa
 2436 # USB support for BWCT console serial adapters
 2437 device          ubser
 2438 # USB support for serial adapters based on the FT8U100AX and FT8U232AM
 2439 device          uftdi
 2440 # USB support for some Windows CE based serial communication.
 2441 device          uipaq
 2442 # USB support for Prolific PL-2303 serial adapters
 2443 device          uplcom
 2444 # USB support for Silicon Laboratories CP2101/CP2102 based USB serial adapters
 2445 device          uslcom
 2446 # USB Visor and Palm devices
 2447 device          uvisor
 2448 # USB serial support for DDI pocket's PHS
 2449 device          uvscom
 2450 #
 2451 # ADMtek USB ethernet. Supports the LinkSys USB100TX,
 2452 # the Billionton USB100, the Melco LU-ATX, the D-Link DSB-650TX
 2453 # and the SMC 2202USB. Also works with the ADMtek AN986 Pegasus
 2454 # eval board.
 2455 device          aue
 2456 
 2457 # ASIX Electronics AX88172 USB 2.0 ethernet driver. Used in the
 2458 # LinkSys USB200M and various other adapters.
 2459 
 2460 device          axe
 2461 
 2462 #
 2463 # Devices which communicate using Ethernet over USB, particularly
 2464 # Communication Device Class (CDC) Ethernet specification. Supports
 2465 # Sharp Zaurus PDAs, some DOCSIS cable modems and so on.
 2466 device          cdce
 2467 #
 2468 # CATC USB-EL1201A USB ethernet. Supports the CATC Netmate
 2469 # and Netmate II, and the Belkin F5U111.
 2470 device          cue
 2471 #
 2472 # Kawasaki LSI ethernet. Supports the LinkSys USB10T,
 2473 # Entrega USB-NET-E45, Peracom Ethernet Adapter, the
 2474 # 3Com 3c19250, the ADS Technologies USB-10BT, the ATen UC10T,
 2475 # the Netgear EA101, the D-Link DSB-650, the SMC 2102USB
 2476 # and 2104USB, and the Corega USB-T.
 2477 device          kue
 2478 #
 2479 # RealTek RTL8150 USB to fast ethernet. Supports the Melco LUA-KTX
 2480 # and the GREEN HOUSE GH-USB100B.
 2481 device          rue
 2482 #
 2483 # Davicom DM9601E USB to fast ethernet. Supports the Corega FEther USB-TXC.
 2484 device          udav
 2485 
 2486 
 2487 # debugging options for the USB subsystem
 2488 #
 2489 options         USB_DEBUG
 2490 
 2491 # options for ukbd:
 2492 options         UKBD_DFLT_KEYMAP        # specify the built-in keymap
 2493 makeoptions     UKBD_DFLT_KEYMAP=it.iso
 2494 
 2495 # options for uplcom:
 2496 options         UPLCOM_INTR_INTERVAL=100        # interrupt pipe interval
 2497                                                 # in milliseconds
 2498 
 2499 # options for uvscom:
 2500 options         UVSCOM_DEFAULT_OPKTSIZE=8       # default output packet size
 2501 options         UVSCOM_INTR_INTERVAL=100        # interrupt pipe interval
 2502                                                 # in milliseconds
 2503 
 2504 #####################################################################
 2505 # FireWire support
 2506 
 2507 device          firewire        # FireWire bus code
 2508 device          sbp             # SCSI over Firewire (Requires scbus and da)
 2509 device          sbp_targ        # SBP-2 Target mode  (Requires scbus and targ)
 2510 device          fwe             # Ethernet over FireWire (non-standard!)
 2511 device          fwip            # IP over FireWire (RFC2734 and RFC3146)
 2512 
 2513 #####################################################################
 2514 # dcons support (Dumb Console Device)
 2515 
 2516 device          dcons                   # dumb console driver
 2517 device          dcons_crom              # FireWire attachment
 2518 options         DCONS_BUF_SIZE=16384    # buffer size
 2519 options         DCONS_POLL_HZ=100       # polling rate
 2520 options         DCONS_FORCE_CONSOLE=0   # force to be the primary console
 2521 options         DCONS_FORCE_GDB=1       # force to be the gdb device
 2522 
 2523 #####################################################################
 2524 # crypto subsystem
 2525 #
 2526 # This is a port of the OpenBSD crypto framework.  Include this when
 2527 # configuring IPSEC and when you have a h/w crypto device to accelerate
 2528 # user applications that link to OpenSSL.
 2529 #
 2530 # Drivers are ports from OpenBSD with some simple enhancements that have
 2531 # been fed back to OpenBSD.
 2532 
 2533 device          crypto          # core crypto support
 2534 device          cryptodev       # /dev/crypto for access to h/w
 2535 
 2536 device          rndtest         # FIPS 140-2 entropy tester
 2537 
 2538 device          hifn            # Hifn 7951, 7781, etc.
 2539 options         HIFN_DEBUG      # enable debugging support: hw.hifn.debug
 2540 options         HIFN_RNDTEST    # enable rndtest support
 2541 
 2542 device          ubsec           # Broadcom 5501, 5601, 58xx
 2543 options         UBSEC_DEBUG     # enable debugging support: hw.ubsec.debug
 2544 options         UBSEC_RNDTEST   # enable rndtest support
 2545 
 2546 #####################################################################
 2547 
 2548 
 2549 #
 2550 # Embedded system options:
 2551 #
 2552 # An embedded system might want to run something other than init.
 2553 options         INIT_PATH=/sbin/init:/stand/sysinstall
 2554 
 2555 # Debug options
 2556 options         BUS_DEBUG       # enable newbus debugging
 2557 options         DEBUG_VFS_LOCKS # enable VFS lock debugging
 2558 options         SOCKBUF_DEBUG   # enable sockbuf last record/mb tail checking
 2559 
 2560 #
 2561 # Verbose SYSINIT
 2562 #
 2563 # Make the SYSINIT process performed by mi_startup() verbose.  This is very
 2564 # useful when porting to a new architecture.  If DDB is also enabled, this
 2565 # will print function names instead of addresses.
 2566 options         VERBOSE_SYSINIT
 2567 
 2568 #####################################################################
 2569 # SYSV IPC KERNEL PARAMETERS
 2570 #
 2571 # Maximum number of entries in a semaphore map.
 2572 options         SEMMAP=31
 2573 
 2574 # Maximum number of System V semaphores that can be used on the system at
 2575 # one time.
 2576 options         SEMMNI=11
 2577 
 2578 # Total number of semaphores system wide
 2579 options         SEMMNS=61
 2580 
 2581 # Total number of undo structures in system
 2582 options         SEMMNU=31
 2583 
 2584 # Maximum number of System V semaphores that can be used by a single process
 2585 # at one time.
 2586 options         SEMMSL=61
 2587 
 2588 # Maximum number of operations that can be outstanding on a single System V
 2589 # semaphore at one time.
 2590 options         SEMOPM=101
 2591 
 2592 # Maximum number of undo operations that can be outstanding on a single
 2593 # System V semaphore at one time.
 2594 options         SEMUME=11
 2595 
 2596 # Maximum number of shared memory pages system wide.
 2597 options         SHMALL=1025
 2598 
 2599 # Maximum size, in bytes, of a single System V shared memory region.
 2600 options         SHMMAX=(SHMMAXPGS*PAGE_SIZE+1)
 2601 options         SHMMAXPGS=1025
 2602 
 2603 # Minimum size, in bytes, of a single System V shared memory region.
 2604 options         SHMMIN=2
 2605 
 2606 # Maximum number of shared memory regions that can be used on the system
 2607 # at one time.
 2608 options         SHMMNI=33
 2609 
 2610 # Maximum number of System V shared memory regions that can be attached to
 2611 # a single process at one time.
 2612 options         SHMSEG=9
 2613 
 2614 # Set the amount of time (in seconds) the system will wait before
 2615 # rebooting automatically when a kernel panic occurs.  If set to (-1),
 2616 # the system will wait indefinitely until a key is pressed on the
 2617 # console.
 2618 options         PANIC_REBOOT_WAIT_TIME=16
 2619 
 2620 # Attempt to bypass the buffer cache and put data directly into the
 2621 # userland buffer for read operation when O_DIRECT flag is set on the
 2622 # file.  Both offset and length of the read operation must be
 2623 # multiples of the physical media sector size.
 2624 #
 2625 options         DIRECTIO
 2626 
 2627 # Specify a lower limit for the number of swap I/O buffers.  They are
 2628 # (among other things) used when bypassing the buffer cache due to
 2629 # DIRECTIO kernel option enabled and O_DIRECT flag set on file.
 2630 #
 2631 options         NSWBUF_MIN=120
 2632 
 2633 #####################################################################
 2634 
 2635 # More undocumented options for linting.
 2636 # Note that documenting these are not considered an affront.
 2637 
 2638 options         CAM_DEBUG_DELAY
 2639 
 2640 # VFS cluster debugging.
 2641 options         CLUSTERDEBUG
 2642 
 2643 options         DEBUG
 2644 
 2645 # Kernel filelock debugging.
 2646 options         LOCKF_DEBUG
 2647 
 2648 # System V compatible message queues
 2649 # Please note that the values provided here are used to test kernel
 2650 # building.  The defaults in the sources provide almost the same numbers.
 2651 # MSGSSZ must be a power of 2 between 8 and 1024.
 2652 options         MSGMNB=2049     # Max number of chars in queue
 2653 options         MSGMNI=41       # Max number of message queue identifiers
 2654 options         MSGSEG=2049     # Max number of message segments
 2655 options         MSGSSZ=16       # Size of a message segment
 2656 options         MSGTQL=41       # Max number of messages in system
 2657 
 2658 options         NBUF=512        # Number of buffer headers
 2659 
 2660 options         SCSI_NCR_DEBUG
 2661 options         SCSI_NCR_MAX_SYNC=10000
 2662 options         SCSI_NCR_MAX_WIDE=1
 2663 options         SCSI_NCR_MYADDR=7
 2664 
 2665 options         SC_DEBUG_LEVEL=5        # Syscons debug level
 2666 options         SC_RENDER_DEBUG # syscons rendering debugging
 2667 
 2668 options         SHOW_BUSYBUFS   # List buffers that prevent root unmount
 2669 options         SLIP_IFF_OPTS
 2670 options         VFS_BIO_DEBUG   # VFS buffer I/O debugging
 2671 
 2672 options         KSTACK_MAX_PAGES=32 # Maximum pages to give the kernel stack
 2673 
 2674 # Adaptec Array Controller driver options
 2675 options         AAC_DEBUG       # Debugging levels:
 2676                                 # 0 - quiet, only emit warnings
 2677                                 # 1 - noisy, emit major function
 2678                                 #     points and things done
 2679                                 # 2 - extremely noisy, emit trace
 2680                                 #     items in loops, etc.
 2681 
 2682 # Yet more undocumented options for linting.
 2683 # BKTR_ALLOC_PAGES has no effect except to cause warnings, and
 2684 # BROOKTREE_ALLOC_PAGES hasn't actually been superseded by it, since the
 2685 # driver still mostly spells this option BROOKTREE_ALLOC_PAGES.
 2686 ##options       BKTR_ALLOC_PAGES=(217*4+1)
 2687 options         BROOKTREE_ALLOC_PAGES=(217*4+1)
 2688 options         MAXFILES=999

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